The Fleet at Flood Tide: America at Total War in the Pacific, 1944-1945

Reviews of The Fleet at Flood Tide: America at Total War in the Pacific, 1944-1945. The Fleet at Flood Tide: America at Total War in the Pacific, 1944-1945 (9780345548702): James D. Hornfischer: Books. Buy online at Aviation Bookstore.

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Winner, 2017 Commodore John Barry Book Award, Navy League of the United States, New York Council * From the historian who has been acclaimed as "doing for the Navy what popular historian Stephen Ambrose did for the Army," here is an unprecedented account of the extraordinary World War II air, land, and sea campaign that brought the U.S. Navy to the apex of its strength and marked the rise of the United States as a global superpower.

"Hornfischer is the dean of World War II naval history…. In his capable hands, the story races along like an intense thriller…. Narrative nonfiction at its finest–a book simply not to be missed." –James M. Scott, Charleston Post and Courier
With its thunderous assault on the Mariana Islands in June 1944, the United States crossed the threshold of total war. In this tour de force of dramatic storytelling, distilled from extensive research in new primary sources, James D. Hornfischer brings to life the campaign that was the fulcrum of the drive to compel Tokyo to surrender–and forever changed the art of modern war. With a close focus on high commanders, front-line combatants, and ordinary people, American and Japanese alike, Hornfischer tells the story of the climactic end stage of the Pacific War as has never been done before. Here are the epic seaborne invasions of Saipan, Tinian and Guam; the stunning aerial battles of the Great Marianas Turkey Shoot; the first large-scale use of Navy underwater demolition teams; the largest banzai attack of the war; and daring combat operations large and small that made possible the strategic bombing offensive culminating in the atomic strikes on Hiroshima and Nagasaki.
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Zero, The Story of Japan’s Air War in the Pacific-as Seen by the Enemy

Reviews of Zero, The Story of Japan’s Air War in the Pacific-as Seen by the Enemy. Zero, The Story of Japan's Air War in the Pacific-as Seen by the Enemy – Kindle edition by Jiro Horikoshi, Masatake Okumiya, Martin Caidin. Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets. Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading Zero, The Story of Japan's Air War in the Pacific-as Seen by the Enemy.. Buy online at Aviation Bookstore.

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This is the thrilling saga of war in the air in the Pacific Theater of Operations during World War II told from the Japanese point of view. It is the story of the men who created, led, and fought in the deadly Zero fighter plane. In their own words, Jiro Horikoshi (who designed the Zero), Masatake Okumiya (leader of many Zero squadrons), and Saburo Sakai (Japan's leading surviving fighter ace) as well as many other men, tell the inside story of developing the Zero and Japan's air force. They tell what it felt like to bomb American ships and to shoot down American airplanes — and then of their shock when the myth of invincibility was shattered by the new Lightning, Hellcat, and Corsair fighters. They tell of the fight against the growing strength of a remorseless American enemy; and how, in desperation the Japanese High Command ordered the creation of deadly suicide squadrons, the Kamikaze. And finally they reveal their reaction to the dropping of the atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

USS Los Angeles: The Navy’s Venerable Airship and Aviation Technology

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Aviation historian William Althoff tells the story of the U.S. Navy’s airship, USS Los Angeles, the most successful aircraft of its type ever flown. In dramatic detail, Althoff recounts how the U.S. Navy arranged for the famed German Zeppelin Company to build the ship, thwarted schemes by the U.S. Army’s Air Service to take control of it, and helped plan its record-breaking, historic four-day flight from Germany to the United States. After years of experiments meant to determine its military and commercial application, the airship ultimately failed to command a consensus in the Navy. “Relegated to a lower tier,” Althoff writes, “the rigid type receded to marginal relevance until, on the eve of World War Two, it vanished altogether.” In this book, the early achievements and unceremonious demise of the Los Angeles after a long career symbolize the airship’s unfulfilled promise. Nonetheless, the operational record of this one machine altered American naval aeronautics and greatly influenced transoceanic commercial air transport during a critical period of its development.

Carrier Strike

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CARRIER STRIKE The Battle of the Santa Cruz Islands, October 1942 Eric Hammel The Battle of the Santa Cruz Islands, a strategic naval action in the bitter Guadalcanal Campaign, was history's fourth carrier-versus-carrier naval battle. Though technically a Japanese victory, the battle proved to be Japan's last serious attempt to win the Pacific War by means of an all-out carrier confrontation. It was during the first four carrier battles-in the six-month period from early May through late October 1942-that the fate of Japan's small, elite naval air arm was sealed. It was at Coral Sea, in May, that Japan's juggernaut across the Pacific was blunted. It was at Midway, in June, that Japan's great carrier fleet was cut down to manageable size. And it was at Eastern Solomons, in August, and Santa Cruz, in October, that Japan's last best carrier air groups were ground to dust. After their technical victory at Santa Cruz, the Japanese withdrew their carriers from the South Pacific-and were never able to use them again as a strategically decisive weapon. Of the four Japanese aircraft carriers that participated in the Santa Cruz battle, only one survived the war. The Japanese "victory" at Santa Cruz cost Japan her last best hope to win the war in the Pacific. Once Japan's veteran carrier air groups had been shredded at off Guadalcanal, at Eastern Solomons and Santa Cruz, Japanese carriers ceased to be a strategic weapon. Carrier Strike is the definitive history of the Battle of the Santa Cruz Islands. Following Santa Cruz and the subsequent series of air and surface engagements known as the Naval Battle of Guadalcanal, the Imperial Navy's Combined Fleet never again attempted a meaningful strategic showdown with the U.S. Pacific Fleet. Though several subsequent surface actions in the Solomons were clearly Japanese victories, their results were short-lived. After November 1942, Japan could not again muster the staying power-or the willpower-to wage a strategic war with her navy. The Santa Cruz clash was deemed a Japanese victory because U.S. naval forces withdrew from the battlefield. That is how victory and defeat are strictly determined. But on the broader, strategic, level, the U.S. Navy won at Santa Cruz-because it was able to achieve its strategic goal of holding the line and buying time. Japan was unable to achieve her strategic goal of defeating the U.S. Pacific Fleet in a final, decisive, all-or-nothing battle. The technical victory cost Japan any serious hope she had of winning the Pacific naval war.

The Coral Sea 1942: The first carrier battle (Campaign)

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Osprey's study of the Battle of the Coral Sea of World War II (1939-1945), which is unique in the annals of naval history. It is the first battle in which enemy fleets never came within sight of one another. Instead, aircraft launched from carrier decks were sent out to attack the enemy with bombs and torpedoes.

In May of 1942, the Japanese fleet moved on Port Moresby, the last Allied base between Australia and Japan. Forced to respond, the Americans sent two aircraft carriers to protect the base. In the ensuing battle, one American carrier was destroyed and the other severely damaged. However, the Japanese also lost a carrier and decided to withdraw. Although bloody, it proved to be an important strategic victory for the Allies as the Japanese were forced to attempt future attacks on Port Moresby over land. Using the latest research and numerous period photographs, retired USN Commander Mark O. Stille tells the story of this important and unique battle in the Pacific War.