Understanding the role of connected devices in recent cyberattacks (Volume 1)

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We live in a world that is increasingly connected. Our smartphones are now capable of locking and unlocking our front doors at home, turning on lights, checking the camera for packages left on the doorstep. We are able to measure our steps, check our baby monitors, record our favorite programs from wherever we have connectivity. We will soon be able to communicate—or, excuse me, we can communicate with our offices, too—but commute to our offices in driverless cars, trains, buses, have our child’s blood sugar checked remotely, and divert important energy resources from town to town efficiently. These are incredible potentially life-saving benefits that our society is learning to embrace, but we are also learning that these innovations do not come without a cost. In fact, recently we encountered a denial of service attack on a scale never before seen. This attack effectively blocked access to popular sites like Netflix and Twitter by weaponizing unsecured network connected devices like cameras and DVRs. Once these devices came under the command and control of bad actors, they were used to send a flood of DNS requests that ultimately rendered the DNS servers ineffective. As I understand it, at the beginning of this attack it was virtually impossible to distinguish malicious traffic from other normal traffic, making it particularly difficult to mitigate against attack. So how do we make ourselves more secure without sacrificing the benefits of innovation and technological advances? A knee-jerk reaction might be to regulate the Internet of Things. And while I am not taking a certain level of regulation off the table, the question is whether we need a more holistic approach. The United States cannot regulate the world. Standards applied to American-designed, American-manufactured, American-sold devices won’t necessarily capture the millions of devices purchased by the billions of people around the world, so the vulnerabilities might remain. Any sustainable and effective solution will require input from all members of the ecosystem of the so-called Internet of Things. We will need a concerted effort to improve not only device security, but also coordinate network security and improve the relationships between industry and security researchers. We are all in this thing together and industry, Government, researchers, and consumers will need to take responsibility for securing this Internet of Things. So today we will hear from a very distinguished panel of witnesses on some of the approaches that can be brought to bear on this challenge. My hope is that this hearing will help to sustain and accelerate conversations on our collective security and foster the innovation that makes the Internet the greatest engine of communications and commerce the world has ever seen.

Mining the Social Web: Data Mining Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Google+, GitHub, and More

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How can you tap into the wealth of social web data to discover who’s making connections with whom, what they’re talking about, and where they’re located? With this expanded and thoroughly revised edition, you’ll learn how to acquire, analyze, and summarize data from all corners of the social web, including Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Google+, GitHub, email, websites, and blogs.

Employ the Natural Language Toolkit, NetworkX, and other scientific computing tools to mine popular social web sitesApply advanced text-mining techniques, such as clustering and TF-IDF, to extract meaning from human language dataBootstrap interest graphs from GitHub by discovering affinities among people, programming languages, and coding projectsBuild interactive visualizations with D3.js, an extraordinarily flexible HTML5 and JavaScript toolkitTake advantage of more than two-dozen Twitter recipes, presented in O’Reilly’s popular "problem/solution/discussion" cookbook format
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Virus & Malware Prevention and Removal

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This book is now available as part of The Big Computer Privacy Book Bundle. Get more for less.

Infected with a virus, Trojan, key logger, rootkit or worm? – Look no further as this book will help you hunt down the pesky malware and secure your system once again.
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Grid Attack – Cyber War Book Two

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Part 2 of 3

Nothing is worse than trying to make the right decision when anything you choose could lead you to your death.
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Worm: The First Digital World War

Worm: The First Digital World WarFrom the author of Black Hawk Down comes the story of the battle between those determined to exploit the internet and those committed to protect it—the ongoing war taking place literally beneath our fingertips.

The Conficker worm infected its first computer in November 2008 and within a month had infiltrated 1.5 million computers in 195 countries. Banks, telecommunications companies, and critical government networks (including the British Parliament and the French and German military) were infected. No one had ever seen anything like it. By January 2009 the worm lay hidden in at least eight million computers and the botnet of linked computers that it had created was big enough that an attack might crash the world. This is the gripping tale of the group of hackers, researches, millionaire Internet entrepreneurs, and computer security experts who united to defend the Internet from the Conficker worm: the story of the first digital world war.

Price: $25.00

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