The Myths of Security: What the Computer Security Industry Doesn’t Want You to Know

The Myths of Security: What the Computer Security Industry Doesn't Want You to KnowIf you think computer security has improved in recent years, The Myths of Security will shake you out of your complacency. Longtime security professional John Viega, formerly Chief Security Architect at McAfee, reports on the sorry state of the industry, and offers concrete suggestions for professionals and individuals confronting the issue.

Why is security so bad? With many more people online than just a few years ago, there are more attackers — and they're truly motivated. Attacks are sophisticated, subtle, and harder to detect than ever. But, as Viega notes, few people take the time to understand the situation and protect themselves accordingly.

This book tells you:

  • Why it's easier for bad guys to “own” your computer than you think
  • Why anti-virus software doesn't work well — and one simple way to fix it
  • Whether Apple OS X is more secure than Windows
  • What Windows needs to do better
  • How to make strong authentication pervasive
  • Why patch management is so bad
  • Whether there's anything you can do about identity theft
  • Five easy steps for fixing application security, and more

Provocative, insightful, and always controversial, The Myths of Security not only addresses IT professionals who deal with security issues, but also speaks to Mac and PC users who spend time online.

Price: $29.99

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The Master Switch: The Rise and Fall of Information Empires

The Master Switch: The Rise and Fall of Information Empires (Borzoi Books)In this age of an open Internet, it is easy to forget that every American information industry, beginning with the telephone, has eventually been taken captive by some ruthless monopoly or cartel. With all our media now traveling a single network, an unprecedented potential is building for centralized control over what Americans see and hear. Could history repeat itself with the next industrial consolidation? Could the Internet—the entire flow of American information—come to be ruled by one corporate leviathan in possession of “the master switch”? That is the big question of Tim Wu’s pathbreaking book.

As Wu’s sweeping history shows, each of the new media of the twentieth century—radio, telephone, television, and film—was born free and open. Each invited unrestricted use and enterprising experiment until some would-be mogul battled his way to total domination. Here are stories of an uncommon will to power, the power over information: Adolph Zukor, who took a technology once used as commonly as YouTube is today and made it the exclusive prerogative of a kingdom called Hollywood . . . NBC’s founder, David Sarnoff, who, to save his broadcast empire from disruptive visionaries, bullied one inventor (of electronic television) into alcoholic despair and another (this one of FM radio, and his boyhood friend) into suicide . . . And foremost, Theodore Vail, founder of the Bell System, the greatest information empire of all time, and a capitalist whose faith in Soviet-style central planning set the course of every information industry thereafter.

Explaining how invention begets industry and industry begets empire—a progress often blessed by government, typically with stifling consequences for free expression and technical innovation alike—Wu identifies a time-honored pattern in the maneuvers of today’s great information powers: Apple, Google, and an eerily resurgent AT&T. A battle royal looms for the Internet’s future, and with almost every aspect of our lives now dependent on that network, this is one war we dare not tune out.

Part industrial exposé, part meditation on what freedom requires in the information age, The Master Switch is a stirring illumination of a drama that has played out over decades in the shadows of our national life and now culminates with terrifying implications for our future.

Price: $27.95

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Hacking and Securing iOS Applications: Stealing Data, Hijacking Software, and How to Prevent It

Hacking and Securing iOS Applications: Stealing Data, Hijacking Software, and How to Prevent It [Paperback]If you’re an app developer with a solid foundation in Objective-C, this book is an absolute must—chances are very high that your company’s iOS applications are vulnerable to attack. That’s because malicious attackers now use an arsenal of tools to reverse-engineer, trace, and manipulate applications in ways that most programmers aren’t aware of.

This guide illustrates several types of iOS attacks, as well as the tools and techniques that hackers use. You’ll learn best practices to help protect your applications, and discover how important it is to understand and strategize like your adversary.

  • Examine subtle vulnerabilities in real-world applications—and avoid the same problems in your apps
  • Learn how attackers infect apps with malware through code injection
  • Discover how attackers defeat iOS keychain and data-protection encryption
  • Use a debugger and custom code injection to manipulate the runtime Objective-C environment
  • Prevent attackers from hijacking SSL sessions and stealing traffic
  • Securely delete files and design your apps to prevent forensic data leakage
  • Avoid debugging abuse, validate the integrity of run-time classes, and make your code harder to trace

Price:

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