Strategic Bombing: Zombie Computer, Botnet, Storm Worm, E-mail Spam, Malware

Strategic Bombing: Zombie Computer, Botnet, Storm Worm, E-mail Spam, MalwareHigh Quality Content by WIKIPEDIA articles! The Storm botnet or Storm worm botnet (not to be confused with StormBot, a TCL script that is not malicious) is a remotely controlled network of “zombie” computers (or “botnet”) that has been linked by the Storm Worm, a Trojan horse spread through e-mail spam. Some have estimated that by September 2007 the Storm botnet was running on anywhere from 1 million to 50 million computer systems. Other sources have placed the size of the botnet to be around 250,000 to 1 million compromised systems. More conservatively, one network security analyst claims to have developed software that has crawled the botnet and estimates that it controls 160,000 infected computers. The Storm botnet was first identified around January 2007, with the Storm worm at one point accounting for 8% of all malware on Microsoft Windows computers.

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Computer Attack and Cyberterrorism

Computer Attack and CyberterrorismMany international terrorist groups now actively use computers and the Internet to communicate, and several may develop or acquire the necessary technical skills to direct a co-ordinated attack against computers in the United States. A cyberattack intended to harm the U.S. economy would likely target computers that operate the civilian critical infrastructure and government agencies. However, there is disagreement among some observers about whether a co-ordinated cyberattack against the U.S. critical infrastructure could be extremely harmful, or even whether computers operating the civilian critical infrastructure actually offer an effective target for furthering terrorists' goals. While there is no published evidence that terrorist organizations are currently planning a co-ordinated attack against computers, computer system vulnerabilities persist world-wide, and initiators of the random cyberattacks that plague computers on the Internet remain largely unknown. Reports from security organisations show that random attacks are now increasingly implemented through use of automated tools, called ‘bots', that direct large numbers of compromised computers to launch attacks through the Internet as swarms. The growing trend toward the use of more automated attack tools has also overwhelmed some of the current methodologies used for tracking Internet cyberattacks. This book provides background information for three types of attacks against computers (cyberattack, physical attack, and electromagnetic attack), and discusses related vulnerabilities for each type of attack.The book also describes the possible effects of a co-ordinated cyberattack, or computer network attack (CNA), against U.S. infrastructure computers, along with possible technical capabilities of international terrorists. Issues for Congress may include how could trends in cyberattacks be measured more effectively; what is appropriate guidance for DOD use of cyberweapons; should cybersecurity be combined with, or remain separate from, the physical security organization within DHS; how can commercial vendors be encouraged to improve the security of their products; and what are options to encourage U.S. citizens to follow better cybersecurity practices. Appendices to this book describe computer viruses, spyware, and ‘bot networks', and how malicious programs are used to enable cybercrime and cyberespionage. Also, similarities are drawn between planning tactics currently used by computer hackers and those used by terrorists groups for conventional attacks.

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Botnet

BotnetBotnet is a jargon term for a collection of software robots, or bots, that run autonomously and automatically. The term is often associated with malicious software, but it can also refer to the network of computers using distributed computing software. While botnets are often named after their malicious software name, there are typically multiple botnets in operation using the same malicious software families, but operated by different criminal entities. While the term “botnet” can be used to refer to any group of bots, such as IRC bots, this word is generally used to refer to a collection of compromised computers running software, usually installed via drive-by downloads exploiting Web browser vulnerabilities, worms, Trojan horses, or backdoors, under a common command-and-control infrastructure.

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Botnets: Storm Botnet, Srizbi Botnet, Zeus, Bot Roast, Kraken Botnet, Mega-D Botnet, Torpig, Akbot, Bot Herder

Botnets: Storm Botnet, Srizbi Botnet, Zeus, Operation: Bot Roast, Kraken Botnet, Mega-D Botnet, Torpig, Akbot, Bot HerderChapters: Storm Botnet, Srizbi Botnet, Zeus, Operation: Bot Roast, Kraken Botnet, Mega-D Botnet, Torpig, Akbot, Bot Herder. Source: Wikipedia. Pages: 52. Not illustrated. Free updates online. Purchase includes a free trial membership in the publisher's book club where you can select from more than a million books without charge. Excerpt: The Storm botnet or Storm worm botnet (not to be confused with StormBot, a TCL script that is not malicious) is a remotely controlled network of “zombie” computers (or “botnet”) that has been linked by the Storm Worm, a Trojan horse spread through e-mail spam. Some have estimated that by September 2007 the Storm botnet was running on anywhere from 1 million to 50 million computer systems. Other sources have placed the size of the botnet to be around 250,000 to 1 million compromised systems. More conservatively, one network security analyst claims to have developed software that has crawled the botnet and estimates that it controls 160,000 infected computers. The Storm botnet was first identified around January 2007, with the Storm worm at one point accounting for 8% of all malware on Microsoft Windows computers. The Storm botnet has been used in a variety of criminal activities. Its controllers and the authors of the Storm Worm have not yet been identified. The Storm botnet has displayed defensive behaviors that indicated that its controllers were actively protecting the botnet against attempts at tracking and disabling it. The botnet has specifically attacked the online operations of some security vendors and researchers who attempted to investigate the botnet. Security expert Joe Stewart revealed that in late 2007, the operators of the botnet began to further decentralize their operations, in possible plans to sell portions of the Storm botnet to other operators.

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Malicious Bots: An Inside Look into the Cyber-Criminal Underground of the Internet

Malicious Bots: An Inside Look into the Cyber-Criminal Underground of the InternetOriginally designed as neutral entities, computerized bots are increasingly being used maliciously by online criminals in mass spamming events, fraud, extortion, identity theft, and software theft. Malicious Bots: An Inside Look into the Cyber-Criminal Underground of the Internet explores the rise of dangerous bots and exposes the nefarious methods of  “botmasters”. This valuable resource assists information security managers in understanding the scope, sophistication, and criminal uses of bots.

With sufficient technical detail to empower IT professionals, this volume provides in-depth coverage of the top bot attacks against financial and government networks over the last several years. The book presents exclusive details of the operation of the notorious Thr34t Krew, one of the most malicious bot herder groups in recent history. Largely unidentified by anti-virus companies, their bots spread globally for months, launching massive distributed denial of service (DDoS) attacks and warez (stolen software distributions). For the first time, this story is publicly revealed, showing how the botherders got arrested, along with details on other bots in the world today. Unique descriptions of the criminal marketplace – how criminals make money off of your computer – are also a focus of this exclusive book!

With unprecedented detail, the book goes on to explain step-by-step how a hacker launches a botnet attack, providing specifics that only those entrenched in the cyber-crime investigation world could possibly offer.

Authors Ken Dunham and Jim Melnick serve on the front line of critical cyber-attacks and countermeasures as experts in the deployment of geopolitical and technical bots. Their work involves advising upper-level government officials and executives who control some of the largest networks in the world. By examining the methods of Internet predators, information security managers will be better able to proactively protect their own networks from such attacks.

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