A Fierce Domain: Conflict in Cyberspace, 1986 to 2012

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A Fierce Domain: Conflict in Cyberspace, 1986-2012 is the first book of its kind- a comprehensive, accessible history of cyber conflict. A Fierce Domain reaches back to look at the major "wake-up calls," the major conflicts that have forced the realization that cyberspace is a harsh place where nations and others contest for superiority. The book identifies the key lessons for policymakers, and, most importantly, where these lessons greatly differ from popular myths common in military and political circles.

Cyber Spying Tracking Your Family’s (Sometimes) Secret Online Lives

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This book shows everyday computer users how to become cyber-sleuths. It takes readers through the many different issues involved in spying on someone online. It begins with an explanation of reasons and ethics, covers the psychology of spying, describes computer and network basics, and takes readers step-by-step through many common online activities, and shows what can be done to compromise them. The book's final section describes personal privacy and counter-spy techniques. By teaching by both theory and example this book empowers readers to take charge of their computers and feel confident they can be aware of the different online activities their families engage in.

Expert authors have worked at Fortune 500 companies, NASA, CIA, NSA and all reside now at Sytex, one of the largest government providers of IT services.
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Mobile and Web Messaging: Messaging Protocols for Web and Mobile Devices

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Learn how to use messaging technologies to build responsive and resilient applications for mobile devices and web browsers. With this hands-on guide, you’ll use the STOMP and MQTT messaging protocols to write iOS and web applications capable of sending and receiving GPS and device sensor data, text messages, and alerts.

Messaging protocols are not only simple to use, but also conserve network bandwidth, device memory, and batteries. Using this book’s step-by-step format, author Jeff Mesnil helps you work with Objective-C and JavaScript libraries, as well as the protocols. All you need to get started are basic programming skills.Understand basic messaging concepts and compositionLearn two common messaging models: point-to-point and publish/subscribeUse STOMP to write an iOS application that sends GPS data, and a web app that consumes the dataBuild an iOS app with MQTT that tracks and broadcasts device motion data, and a web app that displays the data and sends alertsExtend STOMP to filter, prioritize, persist, and expire messagesTake a complete tour of STOMP and MQTT, including features not used in the book’s sample apps

Usenet & The Future of Anonymity

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Amazon Price: $6.99 $6.99 (as of May 20, 2018 07:26 – Details). Product prices and availability are accurate as of the date/time indicated and are subject to change. Any price and availability information displayed on the Amazon site at the time of purchase will apply to the purchase of this product.

Usenet. The term conjures up images of archaic bulletin boards from the 1980s & 1990s in which jacking in meant astronomical charges every month. No longer. Ignore those who say "Don't talk about Usenet". No longer can you afford to leave your IP address out there for the world to see. You want privacy & anonymity? Come to Usenet. This book will teach you how. – Superior to P2P & Forums in every conceivable way where intelligent discussion is concerned – Immune from lawsuits – Ignored by Law Enforcement–because their p2p tracking systems don't work with Usenet! – The BEST newsgroups for discussion, mp3s/games/HD material – Learn why anonymity will decrease with peer-to-peer systems (as it always has) but increase with Usenet – Why Usenet is a free-for-all and ratio-free (unlike peer-to-peer systems) – Everything you need to know to set up a Usenet account and leech to your heart's content – Tor, PGP, Remailers/Mixmaster, SSL, Truecrypt and the like all have their place in Usenet. Learn about them here! – Which Vpn and Usenet companies might rat you out, and which won't Questions: Why should one use Usenet and not BitTorrent? – Enhanced discussions, both moderated and unmoderated, are prevalent in hundreds of thousands of different newsgroups. Usenet is where the -intelligent- users go to engage in logical discussions, and it is still the bastion of free speech and the most bang-for-your-buck where text and binary groups are concerned. What about lawsuits? – There has never been a lawsuit regarding Usenet use. The record and movie industries target torrenters for a reason: ignorance of the way those systems work. Usenet is an entirely different beast. Coupled with Tor, remailers and/or a vpn, Usenet is a fortress against Big Brother and shady law enforcement types, as well as all of the greedy lawyers who work for the millionaires in the entertainment industry. Anonymity on Usenet? – Yes it is possible to be anonymous on Usenet. Tools like Tor, Vpns, Remailers & Mixmaster provide this, however they are not necessary in every instance. It primarily depends on what you wish to accomplish, and which groups you're participating in. I go into detail about this in the book. Excerpt: Chapter 3: Usenet Anonymity "In this chapter, we’ll discuss ways you can add security (not to be confused with privacy) to your Usenet connection, so that you can participate in discussion groups without fear of persecution. These methods often lend themselves to situations where you may lose your Usenet account if you say the wrong things to the wrong people. Usenet companies are big business now, and unlike twelve years ago, will now think nothing of terminating your account of they get enough complaints. Simply being unpopular and taking a stand against the status quo in certain newsgroups can get your Usenet account banned (i.e. alt.privacy). However, with true anonymity, you can rest assured you will not be persecuted for speaking out against a tyrannical government, or a company that you work for (which has happened many times by disgruntled employees on Facebook). It should be stated at the outset that using Tor for Usenet binary downloads will actually strain the Tor network, just as it does with torrents. And to boot, whenever you use torrents, the torrent software actually sends your IP address to the recipient. It does so anonymously, in the same way a post office worker will deliver you your mail. Needless to say this defeats the purpose of using torrents. This problem is not with the Tor code, but rather the way that applications like BitLord and BitTorrent are designed. The torrent applications themselves need to be coded to allow anonymity. It is better to use Freenet with the Frost addon for p2p-like trading if you wish to remain anonymous. Tor is much more efficient at textual discussions, but the easiest method to do this anonymously is by use of remailers…"

The Black Box Society: The Secret Algorithms That Control Money and Information

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Every day, corporations are connecting the dots about our personal behavior—silently scrutinizing clues left behind by our work habits and Internet use. But who connects the dots about what firms are doing with all this information? Frank Pasquale exposes how powerful interests abuse secrecy for profit and explains ways to rein them in.