Financial Crime and Gambling in a Virtual World: A New Frontier in Cybercrime

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'Virtual currencies, particularly crypt-currencies, have been identified as potential money laundering and terrorism financing instruments due to their ability to transfer money anonymously and instantaneously over the globe. Governments and regulators have also recognized the need to more closely monitor and track virtual currency purchases and accounts to avoid the industry being exploited for money laundering or terrorism financing purposes, as explained in this book. The broad overview of various international legal approaches attempting to address this issue would be a great resource for legal and anti-money laundering or counter terrorism financing graduate students, scholars and practitioners interested in virtual currencies research.'
– Raymond Choo, University of South Australia

'This book is a comprehensive, highly detailed review of cybercrime and the issues raised by gambling in virtual environments. It makes an excellent contribution to the evolving discussion about the risks and controls relating to these activities. I would highly recommend it to anyone interested in financial crime and virtual environments from an international perspective.'
– Liz Falconer, University of the West of England, UK
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Cybersecurity and Human Rights in the Age of Cyberveillance

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Cybersecurity and Human Rights in the Age of Cyberveillance is a collection of articles by distinguished authors from the US and Europe and presents a contemporary perspectives on the limits online of human rights. By considering the latest political events and case law, including the NSA PRISM surveillance program controversy, the planned EU data protection amendments, and the latest European Court of Human Rights jurisprudence, it provides an analysis of the ongoing legal discourse on global cyberveillance.

Using examples from contemporary state practice, including content filtering and Internet shutdowns during the Arab Spring as well as the PRISM controversy, the authors identify limits of state and third party interference with individual human rights of Internet users. Analysis is based on existing human rights standards, as enshrined within international law including the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, European Convention on Human Rights and recommendations from the Human Rights Council. The definition of human rights, perceived as freedoms and liberties guaranteed to every human being by international legal consensus will be presented based on the rich body on international law.
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Principles of Cybercrime

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Digital technology has transformed the way in which we socialise and do business. Proving the maxim that crime follows opportunity, virtually every advance has been accompanied by a corresponding niche to be exploited for criminal purposes; so-called 'cybercrimes'. Whether it be fraud, child pornography, stalking, criminal copyright infringement or attacks on computers themselves, criminals will find ways to exploit new technology. The challenge for all countries is to ensure their criminal laws keep pace. The challenge is a global one, and much can be learned from the experience of other jurisdictions. Focusing on Australia, Canada, the UK and the USA, this book provides a comprehensive analysis of the legal principles that apply to the prosecution of cybercrimes. This new edition has been fully revised to take into account changes in online offending, as well as new case law and legislation in this rapidly developing area of the law.

Technology, Policy, Law, and Ethics Regarding U.S. Acquisition and Use of Cyberattack Capabilities

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The United States is increasingly dependent on information and information technology for both civilian and military purposes, as are many other nations. Although there is a substantial literature on the potential impact of a cyberattack on the societal infrastructure of the United States, little has been written about the use of cyberattack as an instrument of U.S. policy.

Cyberattacks–actions intended to damage adversary computer systems or networks–can be used for a variety of military purposes. But they also have application to certain missions of the intelligence community, such as covert action. They may be useful for certain domestic law enforcement purposes, and some analysts believe that they might be useful for certain private sector entities who are themselves under cyberattack. This report considers all of these applications from an integrated perspective that ties together technology, policy, legal, and ethical issues.
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