Financial Crime and Gambling in a Virtual World: A New Frontier in Cybercrime

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'Virtual currencies, particularly crypt-currencies, have been identified as potential money laundering and terrorism financing instruments due to their ability to transfer money anonymously and instantaneously over the globe. Governments and regulators have also recognized the need to more closely monitor and track virtual currency purchases and accounts to avoid the industry being exploited for money laundering or terrorism financing purposes, as explained in this book. The broad overview of various international legal approaches attempting to address this issue would be a great resource for legal and anti-money laundering or counter terrorism financing graduate students, scholars and practitioners interested in virtual currencies research.'
– Raymond Choo, University of South Australia

'This book is a comprehensive, highly detailed review of cybercrime and the issues raised by gambling in virtual environments. It makes an excellent contribution to the evolving discussion about the risks and controls relating to these activities. I would highly recommend it to anyone interested in financial crime and virtual environments from an international perspective.'
– Liz Falconer, University of the West of England, UK
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GlastopfNG: A Web Attack Honeypot

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Today we find web applications in every environment independent of a company's size and even in home networks. This fact made web applications also attractive to cyber criminals as there are new attack vectors like Cross Site Scripting, Remote File Inclusions (RFI) and SQL Injections. Such so called web based attacks can be found on every vulnerability statistic because of these attacks are so widespread. Criminals not only break into web applications, they also overtake whole web servers which than can become part of a botnet or even become a command and control server of such. GlastopfNG, is a honeypot specialized on simulating a vulnerable web server/application to become a target of automated or even manual attack. Instead of trying to block these attacks Glastopf tries to get as much information as possible about the attacker and the used attack itself. This gathered information can then be used in different ways to protect real applications in the future against such attacks.

Who Controls the Internet?: Illusions of a Borderless World

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Is the Internet erasing national borders? Will the future of the Net be set by Internet engineers, rogue programmers, the United Nations, or powerful countries? Whos really in control of whats happening on the Net? In this provocative new book, Jack Goldsmith and Tim Wu tell the fascinating story of the Internets challenge to governmental rule in the 1990s, and the ensuing battles with governments around the world. Its a book about the fate of one idea–that the Internet might liberate us forever from government, borders, and even our physical selves. We learn of Googles struggles with the French government and Yahoos capitulation to the Chinese regime; of how the European Union sets privacy standards on the Net for the entire world; and of eBays struggles with fraud and how it slowly learned to trust the FBI. In a decade of events the original vision is uprooted, as governments time and time again assert their power to direct the future of the Internet. The destiny of the Internet over the next decades, argue Goldsmith and Wu, will reflect the interests of powerful nations and the conflicts within and between them. While acknowledging the many attractions of the earliest visions of the Internet, the authors describe the new order, and speaking to both its surprising virtues and unavoidable vices. Far from destroying the Internet, the experience of the last decade has lead to a quiet rediscovery of some of the oldest functions and justifications for territorial government. While territorial governments have unavoidable problems, it has proven hard to replace what legitimacy governments have, and harder yet to replace the system of rule of law that controls the unchecked evils of anarchy. While the Net will change some of the ways that territorial states govern, it will not diminish the oldest and most fundamental roles of government and challenges of governance. Well written and filled with fascinating examples, including colorful portraits of many key players in Internet history, this is a work that is bound to stir heated debate in the cyberspace community.

Internet Law Jurisdiction

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This casebook explores Internet Law as a coherent if organic whole — integrating the historical sweep of the global Internet’s development with both the opportunities and problems it has brought about. The book is broad and thorough enough to be the primary or sole text for a variety of Internet-related courses, while deep enough to bring students through the important nuances of such doctrinal topics as copyright, privacy and jurisdiction without assuming any particular prior exposure to these subfields

Inventing the Internet (Inside Technology)

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Since the late 1960s the Internet has grown from a single experimental network serving a dozen sites in the United States to a network of networks linking millions of computers worldwide. In Inventing the Internet, Janet Abbate recounts the key players and technologies that allowed the Internet to develop; but her main focus is always on the social and cultural factors that influenced the Internets design and use. The story she unfolds is an often twisting tale of collaboration and conflict among a remarkable variety of players, including government and military agencies, computer scientists in academia and industry, graduate students, telecommunications companies, standards organizations, and network users. The story starts with the early networking breakthroughs formulated in Cold War think tanks and realized in the Defense Department's creation of the ARPANET. It ends with the emergence of the Internet and its rapid and seemingly chaotic growth. Abbate looks at how academic and military influences and attitudes shaped both networks; how the usual lines between producer and user of a technology were crossed with interesting and unique results; and how later users invented their own very successful applications, such as electronic mail and the World Wide Web. She concludes that such applications continue the trend of decentralized, user-driven development that has characterized the Internet's entire history and that the key to the Internet's success has been a commitment to flexibility and diversity, both in technical design and in organizational culture.