CyberWar

Si Vis Pacem, Para Bellum

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Cybersecurity, Botnets, and Cyberterrorism

Cybersecurity, Botnets, and CyberterrorismCybercrime is becoming more organised and established as a transnational business. High technology online skills are now available for rent to a variety of customers, possibly including nation states, or individuals and groups that could secretly represent terrorist groups. The increased use of automated attack tools by cybercriminals has overwhelmed some current methodologies used for tracking Internet cyberattacks, and vulnerabilities of the U.S. critical infrastructure, which are acknowledged openly in publications, could possibly attract cyberattacks to extort money, or damage the U.S. economy to affect national security. In April and May 2007, NATO and the United States sent computer security experts to Estonia to help that nation recover from cyberattacks directed against government computer systems, and to analyze the methods used and determine the source of the attacks. Some security experts suspect that political protestors may have rented the services of cybercriminals, possibly a large network of infected PCs, called a ‘botnet’, to help disrupt the computer systems of the Estonian government. DOD officials have also indicated that similar cyberattacks from individuals and countries targeting economic, political, and military organisations may increase in the future. Cybercriminals have reportedly made alliances with drug traffickers in Afghanistan, the Middle East, and elsewhere where profitable illegal activities are used to support terrorist groups. In addition, designs for cybercrime botnets are becoming more sophisticated, and future botnet architectures may be more resistant to computer security countermeasures. This book discusses options now open to nation states, extremists, or terrorist groups for obtaining malicious technical services from cybercriminals to meet political or military objectives, and describes the possible effects of a co-ordinated cyberattack against the U.S. critical infrastructure.

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The Cyber Commander’s eHandbook Version 3

CYBER WARFARE: The Cyber Commander's eHandbook Version 3 (The Weaponry and Strategies of Digital Conflict and Cyber War, Version 3 - 296 Page eBook covering Cyber Warfare, Cyber Terrorism, Cyber Tradecraft, Cyber Activism and offensive, defensive actions and intelligence collection.)

The Weaponry and Strategies of Digital Conflict and Cyber War, Version 3, covering Cyber Warfare, Cyber Terrorism, Cyber Tradecraft, Cyber Activism and offensive, defensive actions and intelligence collection.

Cyber warfare, cyber terrorism, cyber espionage and cyber crime are all growing threats. The 2012 Version 3 of the Cyber Commander’s eHandbook provides the insight needed to understand the new world of cyber warfare, as well as defines the tools and techniques for offensive and defensive cyber action, and provide cyber intelligence needed to understand the strategies behind building a dynamic and relevant cyber warfare capability.

Table of Contents

Chapter 1 – Introduction
Chapter 2 – Setting the Stage
Chapter 3 – Cyber Espionage
Chapter 4 – Cyber Terrorism
Chapter 5 – Cyber Intelligence
Chapter 6 – Cyber Weapons
Chapter 7 – EMP Devices
Chapter 8 – Attack Process
Chapter 9 – Critical Infrastructure
Chapter 10 – Cyber Doctrine
Chapter 11 – Cyber Infrastructure
Chapter 12 – New Cyber Warfare Models
Chapter 13 – Conclusion

Portions of this book have been republished in 36 different countries with over 100,000 readers.

Our cyber warfare distance learning program is a great companion product!

Course Information: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B003HD06ZG/ref=nosim/cybe0f8-20

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Netcat Power Tools

Netcat Power ToolsOriginally released in 1996, Netcat is a netowrking program designed to read and write data across both Transmission Control Protocol TCP and User Datagram Protocol (UDP) connections using the TCP/Internet Protocol (IP) protocol suite. Netcat is often referred to as a “Swiss Army knife” utility, and for good reason. Just like the multi-function usefullness of the venerable Swiss Army pocket knife, Netcat’s functionality is helpful as both a standalone program and a backe-end tool in a wide range of applications. Some of the many uses of Netcat include port scanning, transferring files, grabbing banners, port listening and redirection, and more nefariously, a backdoor. This is the only book dedicated to comprehensive coverage of the tool’s many features, and by the end of this book, you’ll discover how Netcat can be one of the most valuable tools in your arsenal.

* Get Up and Running with Netcat Simple yet powerful…Don’t let the trouble-free installation and the easy command line belie the fact that Netcat is indeed a potent and powerful program.
* Go PenTesting with Netcat Master Netcat’s port scanning and service identification capabilities as well as obtaining Web server application information. Test and verify outbound firewall rules and avoid detection by using antivirus software and the Window Firewall. Also, create a backdoor using Netcat.
* Conduct Enumeration and Scanning with Netcat, Nmap, and More! Netcat’s not the only game in town…Learn the process of network of enumeration and scanning, and see how Netcat along with other tools such as Nmap and Scanrand can be used to thoroughly identify all of the assets on your network.
* Banner Grabbing with Netcat Banner grabbing is a simple yet highly effective method of gathering information about a remote target, and can be performed with relative ease with the Netcat utility.
* Explore the Dark Side of Netcat See the various ways Netcat has been used to provide malicious, unauthorized access to their targets. By walking through these methods used to set up backdoor access and circumvent protection mechanisms through the use of Netcat, we can understand how malicious hackers obtain and maintain illegal access. Embrace the dark side of Netcat, so that you may do good deeds later.
* Transfer Files Using Netcat The flexability and simple operation allows Netcat to fill a niche when it comes to moving a file or files in a quick and easy fashion. Encryption is provided via several different avenues including integrated support on some of the more modern Netcat variants, tunneling via third-party tools, or operating system integrated IPsec policies.
* Troubleshoot Your Network with Netcat Examine remote systems using Netat’s scanning ability. Test open ports to see if they really are active and see what protocls are on those ports. Communicate with different applications to determine what problems might exist, and gain insight into how to solve these problems.
* Sniff Traffic within a System Use Netcat as a sniffer within a system to collect incoming and outgoing data. Set up Netcat to listen at ports higher than 1023 (the well-known ports), so you can use Netcat even as a normal user.

* Comprehensive introduction to the #4 most popular open source security tool available
* Tips and tricks on the legitimate uses of Netcat
* Detailed information on its nefarious purposes
* Demystifies security issues surrounding Netcat
* Case studies featuring dozens of ways to use Netcat in daily tasks

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Unmasked

UnmaskedAnonymous got lucky. When five of its hackers attacked security company HBGary Federal on February 6, 2011, they were doing so in order to defend the group’s privacy. It wasn’t because they hoped to reveal plans to attack WikiLeaks, create surveillance cells targeting pro-union organizations, and sell sophisticated rootkits to the US government for use as offensive cyber weapons—but that’s what they found.

In the weeks after the attack, the hackers released tens of thousands of e-mail messages and made headlines around the world. Aaron Bar, the CEO of HBGary Federal, eventually resigned; 12 Congressman called for an investigation; an ethics complaint was lodged against a major DC law firm involved with some of the more dubious plans.

Join Ars’ editors as they dig into the secret world of Anonymous and hackers for hire in Unmasked.

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Botnets: Storm Botnet, Srizbi Botnet, Zeus, Bot Roast, Kraken Botnet, Mega-D Botnet, Torpig, Akbot, Bot Herder

Botnets: Storm Botnet, Srizbi Botnet, Zeus, Operation: Bot Roast, Kraken Botnet, Mega-D Botnet, Torpig, Akbot, Bot HerderChapters: Storm Botnet, Srizbi Botnet, Zeus, Operation: Bot Roast, Kraken Botnet, Mega-D Botnet, Torpig, Akbot, Bot Herder. Source: Wikipedia. Pages: 52. Not illustrated. Free updates online. Purchase includes a free trial membership in the publisher’s book club where you can select from more than a million books without charge. Excerpt: The Storm botnet or Storm worm botnet (not to be confused with StormBot, a TCL script that is not malicious) is a remotely controlled network of “zombie” computers (or “botnet”) that has been linked by the Storm Worm, a Trojan horse spread through e-mail spam. Some have estimated that by September 2007 the Storm botnet was running on anywhere from 1 million to 50 million computer systems. Other sources have placed the size of the botnet to be around 250,000 to 1 million compromised systems. More conservatively, one network security analyst claims to have developed software that has crawled the botnet and estimates that it controls 160,000 infected computers. The Storm botnet was first identified around January 2007, with the Storm worm at one point accounting for 8% of all malware on Microsoft Windows computers. The Storm botnet has been used in a variety of criminal activities. Its controllers and the authors of the Storm Worm have not yet been identified. The Storm botnet has displayed defensive behaviors that indicated that its controllers were actively protecting the botnet against attempts at tracking and disabling it. The botnet has specifically attacked the online operations of some security vendors and researchers who attempted to investigate the botnet. Security expert Joe Stewart revealed that in late 2007, the operators of the botnet began to further decentralize their operations, in possible plans to sell portions of the Storm botnet to other operators.

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