CyberWar

Si Vis Pacem, Para Bellum

By

Chained Exploits: Advanced Hacking Attacks from Start to Finish

Chained Exploits: Advanced Hacking Attacks from Start to FinishThe complete guide to today’s hard-to-defend chained attacks: performing them and preventing them

Nowadays, it’s rare for malicious hackers to rely on just one exploit or tool; instead, they use “chained” exploits that integrate multiple forms of attack to achieve their goals. Chained exploits are far more complex and far more difficult to defend. Few security or hacking books cover them well and most don’t cover them at all. Now there’s a book that brings together start-to-finish information about today’s most widespread chained exploits–both how to perform them and how to prevent them.

Chained Exploits demonstrates this advanced hacking attack technique through detailed examples that reflect real-world attack strategies, use today’s most common attack tools, and focus on actual high-value targets, including credit card and healthcare data. Relentlessly thorough and realistic, this book covers the full spectrum of attack avenues, from wireless networks to physical access and social engineering.

Writing for security, network, and other IT professionals, the authors take you through each attack, one step at a time, and then introduce today’s most effective countermeasures— both technical and human. Coverage includes:

  • Constructing convincing new phishing attacks
  • Discovering which sites other Web users are visiting
  • Wreaking havoc on IT security via wireless networks
  • Disrupting competitors’ Web sites
  • Performing–and preventing–corporate espionage
  • Destroying secure files
  • Gaining access to private healthcare records
  • Attacking the viewers of social networking pages
  • Creating entirely new exploits
  • and more

Andrew Whitaker, Director of Enterprise InfoSec and Networking for Training Camp, has been featured in The Wall Street Journal and BusinessWeek. He coauthored Penetration Testing and Network Defense. Andrew was a winner of EC Council’s Instructor of Excellence Award.

Keatron Evans is President and Chief Security Consultant of Blink Digital Security, LLC, a trainer for Training Camp, and winner of EC Council’s Instructor of Excellence Award.

Jack B. Voth specializes in penetration testing, vulnerability assessment, and perimeter security. He co-owns The Client Server, Inc., and teaches for Training Camp throughout the United States and abroad.

informit.com/aw

Cover photograph © Corbis /

Jupiter Images

$49.99 US

$59.99 CANADA

Price: $49.99

Click here to buy from Amazon

By

Cyber War: The Next Threat to National Security and What to Do about It

Cyber War: The Next Threat to National Security and What to Do about It“The Forgotten Homeland” gathers some of the leading homeland security experts to analyze the United States’ most significant vulnerabilities and to propose strategies to reduce them. The report addresses terrorist as well as non-terrorist threats, and offers ideas for strengthening all aspects of emergency response – including the ability to respond to natural disasters such as Hurricane Katrina.

 

 

 

 

 

Price:

Click here to buy from Amazon

By

National Defense Strategy – United States of America

National Defense Strategy - United States of AmericaThe United States, our allies, and our partners face a spectrum of challenges, including violent transnational extremist networks, hostile states armed with weapons of mass destruction, rising regional powers, emerging space and cyber threats, natural and pandemic disasters, and a growing competition for resources. The Department of Defense must respond to these challenges while anticipating and preparing for those of tomorrow. We must balance strategic risk across our responses, making the best use of the tools at hand within the U.S. Government and among our international partners. To succeed, we must harness and integrate all aspects of national power and work closely with a wide range of allies, friends and partners. We cannot prevail if we act alone.

As noted in the 2006 QDR, state actors no longer have a monopoly over the catastrophic use of violence. Small groups or individuals can harness chemical, biological, or even crude radiological or nuclear devices to cause extensive damage and harm. Similarly, they can attack vulnerable points in cyberspace and disrupt commerce and daily life in the United States, causing economic damage, compromising sensitive information and materials, and interrupting critical services such as power and information networks. National security and domestic resources may be at risk, and the Department must help respond to protect lives and national assets. The Department will continue to be both bulwark and active protector in these areas. Yet, in the long run the Department of Defense is neither the best source of resources and capabilities nor the appropriate authority to shoulder these tasks. The comparative advantage, and applicable authorities, for action reside elsewhere in the U.S. Government, at other levels of government, in the private sector, and with partner nations. DoD should expect and plan to play a key supporting role in an interagency effort to combat these threats, and to help develop new capacities and capabilities, while protecting its own vulnerabilities.

In the contemporary strategic environment, the challenge is one of deterring or dissuading a range of potential adversaries from taking a variety of actions against the U.S. and our allies and interests. These adversaries could be states or non-state actors; they could use nuclear, conventional, or unconventional weapons; and they could exploit terrorism, electronic, cyber and other forms of warfare. Economic interdependence and the growth of global communications further complicate the situation. Not only do they blur the types of threats, they also exacerbate sensitivity to the effects of attacks and in some cases make it more difficult to attribute or trace them. Finally, the number of potential adversaries, the breadth of their capabilities, and the need to design approaches to deterrence for each, create new challenges.

An underlying assumption in our understanding of the strategic environment is that the predominant near-term challenges to the United States will come from state and non-state actors using irregular and catastrophic capabilities. Although our advanced space and cyber-space assets give us unparalleled advantages on the traditional battlefield, they also entail vulnerabilities.

China is developing technologies to disrupt our traditional advantages. Examples include development of anti-satellite capabilities and cyber warfare. Other actors, particularly non-state actors, are developing asymmetric tactics, techniques, and procedures that seek to avoid situations where our advantages come into play.

Download National Defense Strategy – United States of America

By

Botnets, Cybercrime, and Cyberterrorism: Vulnerabilities and Policy Issues for Congress: Congressional Research Service, January 29, 2008

Amazon Price: $14.99 $14.99 (as of April 28, 2017 22:21 – Details). Product prices and availability are accurate as of the date/time indicated and are subject to change. Any price and availability information displayed on the Amazon site at the time of purchase will apply to the purchase of this product.

Cybercrime is becoming more organized and established as a transnational business. High technology online skills are now available for rent to a variety of customers, possibly including nation states, or individuals and groups that could secretly represent terrorist groups. The increased use of automated attack tools by cybercriminals has overwhelmed some current methodologies used for tracking Internet cyberattacks, and vulnerabilities of the U.S. critical infrastructure, which are acknowledged openly in publications, could possibly attract cyberattacks to extort money, or damage the U.S. economy to affect national security.

By

Mobile Malware Attacks and Defense

Mobile Malware Attacks and DefenseMalware has gone mobile, and the security landscape is changing quickly with emerging attacks on cell phones, PDAs, and other mobile devices. This first book on the growing threat covers a wide range of malware targeting operating systems like Symbian and new devices like the iPhone. Examining code in past, current, and future risks, protect your banking, auctioning, and other activities performed on mobile devices.

* Visual Payloads
View attacks as visible to the end user, including notation of variants.

* Timeline of Mobile Hoaxes and Threats
Understand the history of major attacks and horizon for emerging threates.

* Overview of Mobile Malware Families
Identify and understand groups of mobile malicious code and their variations.

* Taxonomy of Mobile Malware
Bring order to known samples based on infection, distribution, and payload strategies.

* Phishing, SMishing, and Vishing Attacks
Detect and mitigate phone-based phishing (vishing) and SMS phishing (SMishing) techniques.

* Operating System and Device Vulnerabilities
Analyze unique OS security issues and examine offensive mobile device threats.

* Analyze Mobile Malware
Design a sandbox for dynamic software analysis and use MobileSandbox to analyze mobile malware.

* Forensic Analysis of Mobile Malware
Conduct forensic analysis of mobile devices and learn key differences in mobile forensics.

* Debugging and Disassembling Mobile Malware
Use IDA and other tools to reverse-engineer samples of malicious code for analysis.

* Mobile Malware Mitigation Measures
Qualify risk, understand threats to mobile assets, defend against attacks, and remediate incidents.

* Understand the History and Threat Landscape of Rapidly Emerging Mobile Attacks

* Analyze Mobile Device/Platform Vulnerabilities and Exploits

* Mitigate Current and Future Mobile Malware Threats

Price: $59.95

Click here to buy from Amazon

/* */