CyberWar

Si Vis Pacem, Para Bellum

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Cyberspace and the State: Toward a strategy for cyber-power

Cyberspace and the State: Toward a strategy for cyber-power (Adelphi)Are our networked societies really vulnerable, as some have suggested, to a knock-out blow, perpetrated by state-sponsored hackers or terrorists? And what can be done to defend the state from this and from the encroachment of external networks that transcend its borders and breach its laws?

This Adelphi tackles the range of issues raised by our dependence on digital networks. It considers how instantaneous, global communications are challenging national and social orders and what shape those challenges may take as the net is cast ever wider. Comparing the transformations of the Information Age with those of previous generations, when new technologies and emerging transnational threats spread panic in political and strategic circles, the authors examine the real implications for states and statehood. Read more

‘In the cyber domain, policy has fallen far behind technology and operational art. By providing a conceptual framework for looking at what power is in the cyber domain and how it is exercised, this book offers policy-makers valuable guidance in how to think about a major security issue.’ Michael Hayden, Director of the CIA, 2006–09

‘Cyberspace offers a wealth of threats, benefits and opportunities for governments, business and the citizen. This book provides a stimulating contribution to the policy debate around cyber.’ Iain Lobban CB, Director, GCHQ (Government Communications Headquarters)

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Modern Warfare, Intelligence and Deterrence: The Technologies That Are Transforming Them (The Economist)

Modern Warfare, Intelligence and Deterrence: The Technologies That Are Transforming Them (The Economist)An in-depth look at Western military technology from the experts at The Economist

Much has been made of the limitations of Western technology when pitted against today’s low-tech insurgencies. Modern Warfare, Intelligence and Deterrence: The Technology That is Transforming Themexplores emerging high tech military technologies and places them in the larger context of today’s politics, diplomacy, business, and social issues, arguing that, broadly speaking, defense technologies will continue to provide enormous advantages to advanced, Western armed forces.

The book is organized into five parts: land and sea, air and space, the computer factor, intelligence and spycraft, and the road ahead (which examines the coming challenges for Western armies, such as new wars against insurgents operating out of civilian areas). Comprised of a selection of the best writing on the subject from The Economist, each section includes an introduction linking the technological developments to civilian matters.

  • Looks at new and emerging military technologies, including the Panzerfaust-3, a German shoulder-fired heat-seeking antitank missile, the MPR-500, an Israeli precision bomb, Russia’s Sizzler, an anti-ship missile that can travel 300 kilometers, and many others
  • Explains how military and intelligence technologies are changing the world
  • Edited by Benjamin Sutherland, a writer for The Economist and expert on the social, political, and business implications of new and disruptive technologies

A fascinating look at Western military technologies, Modern Warfare, Intelligence and Deterrenceis essential reading for business readers and history buffs, alike.

Price: $24.95

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Corporate Cyberwar

Corporate CyberwarCorporate Cyberwar chronicles the daily battle between technical criminals and law enforcement. As new and advanced ways to cheat and financially ruin companies are discovered, many authorities not only have to figure out ways to stop it, but they also have to create new laws in order to prosecute the perpetrators. This book addresses how businesses/corporations can protect themselves against this increasingly vicious attack. To help convey the importance of protection and awareness, Cyberwar explores two very important cases, WikiLeaks and Stuxnet. Businesses/corporations are given a better understanding of such similar attacks in the future. Corporate Cyberwar does not only focus on problems, it also provides solutions. There is a point by point explanation of how Crimeware, Bot Networks and DDoS (Distributed Denial of Service) take place, which helps businesses/corporations understand exactly what needs to be done in order to prevent the attacks. Cyberwar is not only for those with a moderate understanding of technology, it is also for those with limited understanding of this threat and its devastating effects.

Price: $20.00

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Cyberdeterrence and Cyberwar

Cyberdeterrence and CyberwarCyberspace, where information–and hence serious value–is stored and manipulated, is a tempting target. An attacker could be a person, group, or state and may disrupt or corrupt the systems from which cyberspace is built. When states are involved, it is tempting to compare fights to warfare, but there are important differences. The author addresses these differences and ways the United States protect itself in the face of attack.






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National Defense Strategy – United States of America

National Defense Strategy - United States of AmericaThe United States, our allies, and our partners face a spectrum of challenges, including violent transnational extremist networks, hostile states armed with weapons of mass destruction, rising regional powers, emerging space and cyber threats, natural and pandemic disasters, and a growing competition for resources. The Department of Defense must respond to these challenges while anticipating and preparing for those of tomorrow. We must balance strategic risk across our responses, making the best use of the tools at hand within the U.S. Government and among our international partners. To succeed, we must harness and integrate all aspects of national power and work closely with a wide range of allies, friends and partners. We cannot prevail if we act alone.

As noted in the 2006 QDR, state actors no longer have a monopoly over the catastrophic use of violence. Small groups or individuals can harness chemical, biological, or even crude radiological or nuclear devices to cause extensive damage and harm. Similarly, they can attack vulnerable points in cyberspace and disrupt commerce and daily life in the United States, causing economic damage, compromising sensitive information and materials, and interrupting critical services such as power and information networks. National security and domestic resources may be at risk, and the Department must help respond to protect lives and national assets. The Department will continue to be both bulwark and active protector in these areas. Yet, in the long run the Department of Defense is neither the best source of resources and capabilities nor the appropriate authority to shoulder these tasks. The comparative advantage, and applicable authorities, for action reside elsewhere in the U.S. Government, at other levels of government, in the private sector, and with partner nations. DoD should expect and plan to play a key supporting role in an interagency effort to combat these threats, and to help develop new capacities and capabilities, while protecting its own vulnerabilities.

In the contemporary strategic environment, the challenge is one of deterring or dissuading a range of potential adversaries from taking a variety of actions against the U.S. and our allies and interests. These adversaries could be states or non-state actors; they could use nuclear, conventional, or unconventional weapons; and they could exploit terrorism, electronic, cyber and other forms of warfare. Economic interdependence and the growth of global communications further complicate the situation. Not only do they blur the types of threats, they also exacerbate sensitivity to the effects of attacks and in some cases make it more difficult to attribute or trace them. Finally, the number of potential adversaries, the breadth of their capabilities, and the need to design approaches to deterrence for each, create new challenges.

An underlying assumption in our understanding of the strategic environment is that the predominant near-term challenges to the United States will come from state and non-state actors using irregular and catastrophic capabilities. Although our advanced space and cyber-space assets give us unparalleled advantages on the traditional battlefield, they also entail vulnerabilities.

China is developing technologies to disrupt our traditional advantages. Examples include development of anti-satellite capabilities and cyber warfare. Other actors, particularly non-state actors, are developing asymmetric tactics, techniques, and procedures that seek to avoid situations where our advantages come into play.

Download National Defense Strategy – United States of America

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