Zero Day

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Eight years ago, Addie Webster was the victim of the most notorious kidnapping of the decade. Addie vanished—and her high-profile parents were forced to move on. Mark Webster is now president of the United States, fighting to keep the oval office after a tumultuous first term. Then the unthinkable happens: the president's daughter resurfaces. Addie is brought back into her family's fold, but who is this sixteen-year-old girl with a quiet, burning intelligence now living in the White House? There are those in the president's political circle who find her timely return suspicious. When a national security advisor approaches Darrow Fergusson, Addie's childhood best friend and the son of the president's chief of staff, he doesn't know what to think. How could the girl he's missed for all these years be a threat to national security? Still, at the risk of having his own secrets exposed, Darrow agrees to spy on Addie. He soon realizes that his old friend is much more than the traumatized victim of a sick political fringe group. Addie has come with a mission…but will she choose to complete it?

Chinese Intelligence Operations

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From Publishers Weekly: Written by a Defense Intelligence Agency analyst, this is a straightforward examination of the structure, operations and methodology of the intelligence services of the People's Republic of China. Eftimiades describes how the Ministry of State Security–China's preeminent civilian intelligence-gathering entity–draws on the services of diplomats, commercial representatives, Chinese communities in overseas cities and students. (The People's Republic sends approximately 40,000 students abroad annually.) His analysis of the case of Larry Wu-Tai Chin, a longtime CIA employee who was convicted of espionage in 1986, reveals much about Chinese operations in the United States. Although Eftimiades cautions that the Ministry of State Security will continue to penetrate and exploit the political, academic, industrial and technological institutions of Western nations, he adds reassuringly that China's intelligence apparatus is hobbled by its own red tape and hindered by the stultifying bureaucracy of the Chinese Communist Party. Of interest mainly to specialists.

The End of Intelligence: Espionage and State Power in the Information Age

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Using espionage as a test case, The End of Intelligence criticizes claims that the recent information revolution has weakened the state, revolutionized warfare, and changed the balance of power between states and non-state actors—and it assesses the potential for realizing any hopes we might have for reforming intelligence and espionage.

Examining espionage, counterintelligence, and covert action, the book argues that, contrary to prevailing views, the information revolution is increasing the power of states relative to non-state actors and threatening privacy more than secrecy. Arguing that intelligence organizations may be taken as the paradigmatic organizations of the information age, author David Tucker shows the limits of information gathering and analysis even in these organizations, where failures at self-knowledge point to broader limits on human knowledge—even in our supposed age of transparency. He argues that, in this complex context, both intuitive judgment and morality remain as important as ever and undervalued by those arguing for the transformative effects of information.
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The Cyber Commander’s eHandbook Version 3

CYBER WARFARE: The Cyber Commander's eHandbook Version 3 (The Weaponry and Strategies of Digital Conflict and Cyber War, Version 3 - 296 Page eBook covering Cyber Warfare, Cyber Terrorism, Cyber Tradecraft, Cyber Activism and offensive, defensive actions and intelligence collection.)

The Weaponry and Strategies of Digital Conflict and Cyber War, Version 3, covering Cyber Warfare, Cyber Terrorism, Cyber Tradecraft, Cyber Activism and offensive, defensive actions and intelligence collection.

Cyber warfare, cyber terrorism, cyber espionage and cyber crime are all growing threats. The 2012 Version 3 of the Cyber Commander's eHandbook provides the insight needed to understand the new world of cyber warfare, as well as defines the tools and techniques for offensive and defensive cyber action, and provide cyber intelligence needed to understand the strategies behind building a dynamic and relevant cyber warfare capability.

Table of Contents

Chapter 1 – Introduction
Chapter 2 – Setting the Stage
Chapter 3 – Cyber Espionage
Chapter 4 – Cyber Terrorism
Chapter 5 – Cyber Intelligence
Chapter 6 – Cyber Weapons
Chapter 7 – EMP Devices
Chapter 8 – Attack Process
Chapter 9 – Critical Infrastructure
Chapter 10 – Cyber Doctrine
Chapter 11 – Cyber Infrastructure
Chapter 12 – New Cyber Warfare Models
Chapter 13 – Conclusion

Portions of this book have been republished in 36 different countries with over 100,000 readers.

Our cyber warfare distance learning program is a great companion product!

Course Information: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B003HD06ZG/ref=nosim/cybe0f8-20

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America the Vulnerable: Inside the New Threat Matrix of Digital Espionage, Crime, and Warfare

America the Vulnerable: Inside the New Threat Matrix of Digital Espionage, Crime, and WarfareA former top-level National Security Agency insider goes behind the headlines to explore America's next great battleground: digital security. An urgent wake-up call that identifies our foes; unveils their methods; and charts the dire consequences for government, business, and individuals.

Shortly after 9/11, Joel Brenner entered the inner sanctum of American espionage, first as the inspector general of the National Security Agency, then as the head of counterintelligence for the director of national intelligence. He saw at close range the battleground on which our adversaries are now attacking us-cyberspace. We are at the mercy of a new generation of spies who operate remotely from China, the Middle East, Russia, even France, among many other places. These operatives have already shown their ability to penetrate our power plants, steal our latest submarine technology, rob our banks, and invade the Pentagon‘s secret communications systems.

Incidents like the WikiLeaks posting of secret U.S. State Department cables hint at the urgency of this problem, but they hardly reveal its extent or its danger. Our government and corporations are a “glass house,” all but transparent to our adversaries. Counterfeit computer chips have found their way into our fighter aircraft; the Chinese stole a new radar system that the navy spent billions to develop; our own soldiers used intentionally corrupted thumb drives to download classified intel from laptops in Iraq. And much more.

Dispatches from the corporate world are just as dire. In 2008, hackers lifted customer files from the Royal Bank of Scotland and used them to withdraw $9 million in half an hour from ATMs in the United States, Britain, and Canada. If that was a traditional heist, it would be counted as one of the largest in history. Worldwide, corporations lose on average $5 million worth of intellectual property apiece annually, and big companies lose many times that.

The structure and culture of the Internet favor spies over governments and corporations, and hackers over privacy, and we've done little to alter that balance. Brenner draws on his extraordinary background to show how to right this imbalance and bring to cyberspace the freedom, accountability, and security we expect elsewhere in our lives.

In America the Vulnerable, Brenner offers a chilling and revelatory appraisal of the new faces of war and espionage-virtual battles with dangerous implications for government, business, and all of us.

Price: $27.95

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