CyberWar

Si Vis Pacem, Para Bellum

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Botnets: Storm Botnet, Srizbi Botnet, Zeus, Bot Roast, Kraken Botnet, Mega-D Botnet, Torpig, Akbot, Bot Herder

Botnets: Storm Botnet, Srizbi Botnet, Zeus, Operation: Bot Roast, Kraken Botnet, Mega-D Botnet, Torpig, Akbot, Bot HerderChapters: Storm Botnet, Srizbi Botnet, Zeus, Operation: Bot Roast, Kraken Botnet, Mega-D Botnet, Torpig, Akbot, Bot Herder. Source: Wikipedia. Pages: 52. Not illustrated. Free updates online. Purchase includes a free trial membership in the publisher’s book club where you can select from more than a million books without charge. Excerpt: The Storm botnet or Storm worm botnet (not to be confused with StormBot, a TCL script that is not malicious) is a remotely controlled network of “zombie” computers (or “botnet”) that has been linked by the Storm Worm, a Trojan horse spread through e-mail spam. Some have estimated that by September 2007 the Storm botnet was running on anywhere from 1 million to 50 million computer systems. Other sources have placed the size of the botnet to be around 250,000 to 1 million compromised systems. More conservatively, one network security analyst claims to have developed software that has crawled the botnet and estimates that it controls 160,000 infected computers. The Storm botnet was first identified around January 2007, with the Storm worm at one point accounting for 8% of all malware on Microsoft Windows computers. The Storm botnet has been used in a variety of criminal activities. Its controllers and the authors of the Storm Worm have not yet been identified. The Storm botnet has displayed defensive behaviors that indicated that its controllers were actively protecting the botnet against attempts at tracking and disabling it. The botnet has specifically attacked the online operations of some security vendors and researchers who attempted to investigate the botnet. Security expert Joe Stewart revealed that in late 2007, the operators of the botnet began to further decentralize their operations, in possible plans to sell portions of the Storm botnet to other operators.

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Google Hacking for Penetration Testers

Google Hacking for Penetration TestersA self-respecting Google hacker spends hours trolling the Internet for juicy stuff. Firing off search after search, they thrive on the thrill of finding clean, mean, streamlined queries and get a real rush from sharing those queries and trading screenshots of their findings. I know because I’ve seen it with my own eyes. As the founder of the Google Hacking Database (GHDB) and the Search engine hacking forums at http://johnny.ihackstuff.com, I am constantly amazed at what the Google hacking community comes up with. It turns out the rumors are true-creative Google searches can reveal medical, financial, proprietary and even classified information. Despite government edicts, regulation and protection acts like HIPPA and the constant barking of security watchdogs, this problem still persists. Stuff still makes it out onto the web, and Google hackers snatch it right up. Protect yourself from Google hackers with this new volume of information.
-Johnny Long

. Learn Google Searching Basics
Explore Google’s Web-based Interface, build Google queries, and work with Google URLs.
. Use Advanced Operators to Perform Advanced Queries
Combine advanced operators and learn about colliding operators and bad search-fu.
. Learn the Ways of the Google Hacker
See how to use caches for anonymity and review directory listings and traversal techniques.
. Review Document Grinding and Database Digging
See the ways to use Google to locate documents and then search within the documents to locate information.
. Understand Google’s Part in an Information Collection Framework
Learn the principles of automating searches and the applications of data mining.
. Locate Exploits and Finding Targets
Locate exploit code and then vulnerable targets.
. See Ten Simple Security Searches
Learn a few searches that give good results just about every time and are good for a security assessment.
. Track Down Web Servers
Locate and profile web servers, login portals, network hardware and utilities.
. See How Bad Guys Troll for Data
Find ways to search for usernames, passwords, credit card numbers, social security numbers, and other juicy information.
. Hack Google Services
Learn more about the AJAX Search API, Calendar, Blogger, Blog Search, and more.

Price: $49.95

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A Guide to Kernel Exploitation: Attacking the Core

A Guide to Kernel Exploitation: Attacking the CoreThe number of security countermeasures against user-land exploitation is on the rise. Because of this, kernel exploitation is becoming much more popular among exploit writers and attackers. Playing with the heart of the operating system can be a dangerous game: This book covers the theoretical techniques and approaches needed to develop reliable and effective kernel-level exploits and applies them to different operating systems (Linux, Solaris, Mac OS X, and Windows). Kernel exploits require both art and science to achieve. Every OS has its quirks and so every exploit must be molded to fully exploit its target. This book discusses the most popular OS families-UNIX derivatives, Mac OS X, and Windows-and how to gain complete control over them. Concepts and tactics are presented categorically so that even when a specifically detailed exploit has been patched, the foundational information that you have read will help you to write a newer, better attack or a more concrete design and defensive structure.

  • Covers a range of operating system families – UNIX derivatives, Mac OS X, Windows
  • Details common scenarios such as generic memory corruption (stack overflow, heap overflow, etc.) issues, logical bugs and race conditions
  • Delivers the reader from user-land exploitation to the world of kernel-land (OS) exploits/attacks, with a particular focus on the steps that lead to the creation of successful techniques, in order to give to the reader something more than just a set of tricks

Price: $49.95

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Seven Deadliest Social Network Attacks

Seven Deadliest Social Network Attacks (Syngress Seven Deadliest Attacks)Do you need to keep up with the latest hacks, attacks, and exploits effecting social networks? Then you need Seven Deadliest Social Network Attacks. This book pinpoints the most dangerous hacks and exploits specific to social networks like Facebook, Twitter, and MySpace, laying out the anatomy of these attacks including how to make your system more secure. You will discover the best ways to defend against these vicious hacks with step-by-step instruction and learn techniques to make your computer and network impenetrable.



Attacks detailed in this book include:

  1. Social Networking Infrastructure Attacks
  2. Malware Attacks
  3. Phishing Attacks
  4. Evil Twin Attacks
  5. Identity Theft
  6. Cyber Bullying
  7. Physical Threats
  • Knowledge is power, find out about the most dominant attacks currently waging war on computers and networks globally
  • Discover the best ways to defend against these vicious attacks; step-by-step instruction shows you how
  • Institute countermeasures, don’t be caught defenseless again, learn techniques to make your computer and network impenetrable

Price: $24.95

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National Defense Strategy – United States of America

National Defense Strategy - United States of AmericaThe United States, our allies, and our partners face a spectrum of challenges, including violent transnational extremist networks, hostile states armed with weapons of mass destruction, rising regional powers, emerging space and cyber threats, natural and pandemic disasters, and a growing competition for resources. The Department of Defense must respond to these challenges while anticipating and preparing for those of tomorrow. We must balance strategic risk across our responses, making the best use of the tools at hand within the U.S. Government and among our international partners. To succeed, we must harness and integrate all aspects of national power and work closely with a wide range of allies, friends and partners. We cannot prevail if we act alone.

As noted in the 2006 QDR, state actors no longer have a monopoly over the catastrophic use of violence. Small groups or individuals can harness chemical, biological, or even crude radiological or nuclear devices to cause extensive damage and harm. Similarly, they can attack vulnerable points in cyberspace and disrupt commerce and daily life in the United States, causing economic damage, compromising sensitive information and materials, and interrupting critical services such as power and information networks. National security and domestic resources may be at risk, and the Department must help respond to protect lives and national assets. The Department will continue to be both bulwark and active protector in these areas. Yet, in the long run the Department of Defense is neither the best source of resources and capabilities nor the appropriate authority to shoulder these tasks. The comparative advantage, and applicable authorities, for action reside elsewhere in the U.S. Government, at other levels of government, in the private sector, and with partner nations. DoD should expect and plan to play a key supporting role in an interagency effort to combat these threats, and to help develop new capacities and capabilities, while protecting its own vulnerabilities.

In the contemporary strategic environment, the challenge is one of deterring or dissuading a range of potential adversaries from taking a variety of actions against the U.S. and our allies and interests. These adversaries could be states or non-state actors; they could use nuclear, conventional, or unconventional weapons; and they could exploit terrorism, electronic, cyber and other forms of warfare. Economic interdependence and the growth of global communications further complicate the situation. Not only do they blur the types of threats, they also exacerbate sensitivity to the effects of attacks and in some cases make it more difficult to attribute or trace them. Finally, the number of potential adversaries, the breadth of their capabilities, and the need to design approaches to deterrence for each, create new challenges.

An underlying assumption in our understanding of the strategic environment is that the predominant near-term challenges to the United States will come from state and non-state actors using irregular and catastrophic capabilities. Although our advanced space and cyber-space assets give us unparalleled advantages on the traditional battlefield, they also entail vulnerabilities.

China is developing technologies to disrupt our traditional advantages. Examples include development of anti-satellite capabilities and cyber warfare. Other actors, particularly non-state actors, are developing asymmetric tactics, techniques, and procedures that seek to avoid situations where our advantages come into play.

Download National Defense Strategy – United States of America

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