The Master Switch: The Rise and Fall of Information Empires

The Master Switch: The Rise and Fall of Information Empires (Borzoi Books)In this age of an open Internet, it is easy to forget that every American information industry, beginning with the telephone, has eventually been taken captive by some ruthless monopoly or cartel. With all our media now traveling a single network, an unprecedented potential is building for centralized control over what Americans see and hear. Could history repeat itself with the next industrial consolidation? Could the Internet—the entire flow of American information—come to be ruled by one corporate leviathan in possession of “the master switch”? That is the big question of Tim Wu’s pathbreaking book.

As Wu’s sweeping history shows, each of the new media of the twentieth century—radio, telephone, television, and film—was born free and open. Each invited unrestricted use and enterprising experiment until some would-be mogul battled his way to total domination. Here are stories of an uncommon will to power, the power over information: Adolph Zukor, who took a technology once used as commonly as YouTube is today and made it the exclusive prerogative of a kingdom called Hollywood . . . NBC’s founder, David Sarnoff, who, to save his broadcast empire from disruptive visionaries, bullied one inventor (of electronic television) into alcoholic despair and another (this one of FM radio, and his boyhood friend) into suicide . . . And foremost, Theodore Vail, founder of the Bell System, the greatest information empire of all time, and a capitalist whose faith in Soviet-style central planning set the course of every information industry thereafter.

Explaining how invention begets industry and industry begets empire—a progress often blessed by government, typically with stifling consequences for free expression and technical innovation alike—Wu identifies a time-honored pattern in the maneuvers of today’s great information powers: Apple, Google, and an eerily resurgent AT&T. A battle royal looms for the Internet’s future, and with almost every aspect of our lives now dependent on that network, this is one war we dare not tune out.

Part industrial exposé, part meditation on what freedom requires in the information age, The Master Switch is a stirring illumination of a drama that has played out over decades in the shadows of our national life and now culminates with terrifying implications for our future.

Price: $27.95

Click here to buy from Amazon

Mining the Social Web: Data Mining Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Google+, GitHub, and More

Amazon Price: $49.99 $42.49 You save: $7.50 (15%). (as of April 22, 2018 02:51 – Details). Product prices and availability are accurate as of the date/time indicated and are subject to change. Any price and availability information displayed on the Amazon site at the time of purchase will apply to the purchase of this product.

Want to tap the tremendous amount of valuable social data in Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, GitHub, Instagram, and Google+? This new edition helps you discover who’s making connections with social media, what they’re talking about, and where they’re located. You’ll learn how to combine social web data, analysis techniques, and visualization to find what you’ve been looking for in the social haystack—as well as useful information you didn’t know existed.Get a straightforward synopsis of the social web landscapeUse adaptable scripts on GitHub to harvest data from social network APIs.Learn how to employ easy-to-use Python tools to slice and dice the data you collectExplore social connections in microformats with the XHTML Friends NetworkApply advanced mining techniques such as TF-IDF, cosine similarity, collocation analysis, document summarization, clique detection, and image recognitionBuild interactive visualizations with web technologies based upon HTML5 and JavaScript toolkits

Mining the Social Web: Data Mining Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Google+, GitHub, and More

Rating: 
Amazon Price: $44.99 $29.31 You save: $15.68 (35%). (as of April 21, 2018 16:06 – Details). Product prices and availability are accurate as of the date/time indicated and are subject to change. Any price and availability information displayed on the Amazon site at the time of purchase will apply to the purchase of this product.

How can you tap into the wealth of social web data to discover who’s making connections with whom, what they’re talking about, and where they’re located? With this expanded and thoroughly revised edition, you’ll learn how to acquire, analyze, and summarize data from all corners of the social web, including Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Google+, GitHub, email, websites, and blogs.
Employ the Natural Language Toolkit, NetworkX, and other scientific computing tools to mine popular social web sites Apply advanced text-mining techniques, such as clustering and TF-IDF, to extract meaning from human language data Bootstrap interest graphs from GitHub by discovering affinities among people, programming languages, and coding projects Build interactive visualizations with D3.js, an extraordinarily flexible HTML5 and JavaScript toolkit Take advantage of more than two-dozen Twitter recipes, presented in O’Reilly’s popular "problem/solution/discussion" cookbook format
The example code for this unique data science book is maintained in a public GitHub repository. It’s designed to be easily accessible through a turnkey virtual machine that facilitates interactive learning with an easy-to-use collection of IPython Notebooks.

Piracy: The Intellectual Property Wars from Gutenberg to Gates

Piracy: The Intellectual Property Wars from Gutenberg to GatesSince the rise of Napster and other file-sharing services in its wake, most of us have assumed that intellectual piracy is a product of the digital age and that it threatens creative expression as never before. The Motion Picture Association of America, for instance, claimed that in 2005 the film industry lost $2.3 billion in revenue to piracy online. But here Adrian Johns shows that piracy has a much longer and more vital history than we have realized—one that has been largely forgotten and is little understood.

Piracy explores the intellectual property wars from the advent of print culture in the fifteenth century to the reign of the Internet in the twenty-first. Brimming with broader implications for today’s debates over open access, fair use, free culture, and the like, Johns’s book ultimately argues that piracy has always stood at the center of our attempts to reconcile creativity and commerce—and that piracy has been an engine of social, technological, and intellectual innovations as often as it has been their adversary. From Cervantes to Sonny Bono, from Maria Callas to Microsoft, from Grub Street to Google, no chapter in the story of piracy evades Johns’s graceful analysis in what will be the definitive history of the subject for years to come.

Price: $35.00

Click here to buy from Amazon

Mining the Social Web: Data Mining Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Google+, GitHub, and More

Rating: 
Amazon Price: N/A (as of April 22, 2018 02:51 – Details). Product prices and availability are accurate as of the date/time indicated and are subject to change. Any price and availability information displayed on the Amazon site at the time of purchase will apply to the purchase of this product.

How can you tap into the wealth of social web data to discover who’s making connections with whom, what they’re talking about, and where they’re located? With this expanded and thoroughly revised edition, you’ll learn how to acquire, analyze, and summarize data from all corners of the social web, including Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Google+, GitHub, email, websites, and blogs.

Employ the Natural Language Toolkit, NetworkX, and other scientific computing tools to mine popular social web sitesApply advanced text-mining techniques, such as clustering and TF-IDF, to extract meaning from human language dataBootstrap interest graphs from GitHub by discovering affinities among people, programming languages, and coding projectsBuild interactive visualizations with D3.js, an extraordinarily flexible HTML5 and JavaScript toolkitTake advantage of more than two-dozen Twitter recipes, presented in O’Reilly’s popular "problem/solution/discussion" cookbook format
Continue reading “Mining the Social Web: Data Mining Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Google+, GitHub, and More”