CyberWar

Si Vis Pacem, Para Bellum

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The Pentagon’s Brain: An Uncensored History of DARPA, America’s Top-Secret Military Research Agency

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Amazon Price: $30.00 $20.40 You save: $9.60 (32%). (as of March 28, 2017 21:02 – Details). Product prices and availability are accurate as of the date/time indicated and are subject to change. Any price and availability information displayed on the Amazon site at the time of purchase will apply to the purchase of this product.

The definitive history of DARPA, the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency, from the author of the New York Times bestseller Area 51

No one has ever written the history of the Defense Department's most secret, most powerful, and most controversial military science R&D agency. In the first-ever history about the organization, New York Times bestselling author Annie Jacobsen draws on inside sources, exclusive interviews, private documents, and declassified memos to paint a picture of DARPA, or "the Pentagon's brain," from its Cold War inception in 1958 to the present.
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The Nature of War in the Information Age: Clausewitzian Future (Strategy and History)

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There has been a great deal of speculation recently concerning the likely impact of the 'Information Age' on warfare. In this vein, much of the Revolution in Military Affairs (RMA) literature subscribes to the idea that the Information Age will witness a transformation in the very nature of war. In this book, David Lonsdale puts that notion to the test.

Using a range of contexts, the book sets out to look at whether the classical Clausewitzian theory of the nature of war will retain its validity in this new age. The analysis covers the character of the future battlespace, the function of command, and the much-hyped concept of Strategic Information Warfare. Finally, the book broadens its perspective to examine the nature of 'Information Power' and its implications for geopolitics. Through an assessment of both historical and contemporary case studies (including the events following September 11 and the recent war in Iraq), the author concludes that although the future will see many changes to the conduct of warfare, the nature of war, as given theoretical form by Clausewitz, will remain essentially unchanged.

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Modern Warfare, Intelligence and Deterrence: The Technologies That Are Transforming Them (The Economist)

Modern Warfare, Intelligence and Deterrence: The Technologies That Are Transforming Them (The Economist)An in-depth look at Western military technology from the experts at The Economist

Much has been made of the limitations of Western technology when pitted against today’s low-tech insurgencies. Modern Warfare, Intelligence and Deterrence: The Technology That is Transforming Themexplores emerging high tech military technologies and places them in the larger context of today’s politics, diplomacy, business, and social issues, arguing that, broadly speaking, defense technologies will continue to provide enormous advantages to advanced, Western armed forces.

The book is organized into five parts: land and sea, air and space, the computer factor, intelligence and spycraft, and the road ahead (which examines the coming challenges for Western armies, such as new wars against insurgents operating out of civilian areas). Comprised of a selection of the best writing on the subject from The Economist, each section includes an introduction linking the technological developments to civilian matters.

  • Looks at new and emerging military technologies, including the Panzerfaust-3, a German shoulder-fired heat-seeking antitank missile, the MPR-500, an Israeli precision bomb, Russia’s Sizzler, an anti-ship missile that can travel 300 kilometers, and many others
  • Explains how military and intelligence technologies are changing the world
  • Edited by Benjamin Sutherland, a writer for The Economist and expert on the social, political, and business implications of new and disruptive technologies

A fascinating look at Western military technologies, Modern Warfare, Intelligence and Deterrenceis essential reading for business readers and history buffs, alike.

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Strategy: Context and Adaptation from Archidamus to Airpower (Transforming War)

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Amazon Price: $39.95 $22.30 You save: $17.65 (44%). (as of March 28, 2017 16:17 – Details). Product prices and availability are accurate as of the date/time indicated and are subject to change. Any price and availability information displayed on the Amazon site at the time of purchase will apply to the purchase of this product.

How does one engage in the study of strategy? Strategy: Context and Adaptation from Archidamus to Airpower argues that strategy is not just concerned with amassing knowledge; it is also about recognizing our imperfect understanding of the environment and respecting the complex nature of adaptation to the unforeseen or unexpected. In essence, the strongest strategists are those who commit to an education that cultivates a more holistic and adaptive way of thinking. With that thought in mind, the contributors to Strategy, each a current or former professor at the School of Advanced Air and Space Studies, widely considered the Department of Defense’s premier school of strategy, offer ways of thinking strategically about a variety of subject matters, from classical history to cyber power.

Practitioners in the profession of arms, perhaps more than any other profession, must employ critical thinking where the application of power on land, at sea, in the air, and in space and cyberspace are concerned. Strategy examines various sub-disciplines regarding the use of power, and illuminates different approaches to thinking which have implications beyond the implementation of force.

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Applying Lessons Learned from Interwar Airpower (1919-1939) to Joint Warfighting with Cyberpower

Amazon Price: $14.95 $14.95 (as of March 28, 2017 08:18 – Details). Product prices and availability are accurate as of the date/time indicated and are subject to change. Any price and availability information displayed on the Amazon site at the time of purchase will apply to the purchase of this product.

The United States has yet to use cyberwarfare in a major conflict, and the military services have differing ideas on what role cyberwarfare will play in America's next war. In addition, the services have unique and often contradictory perspectives on how they see the employment of cyberwarfare in military operations, and this conflict may affect combatant commanders' ability to employ cyberwarfare in their areas of responsibility. The United States military faced a similar problem after World War I when attempting to understand and exploit the nascent capabilities of airpower, which showed great potential but exited the Great War with an inconclusive service record. The Interwar Period saw rapid advancement in aviation, and the U.S. military struggled with questions of how to best organize, equip, and employ airpower after World War I's inconclusive results. The differing approaches of the United States Army and the United States Navy toward airpower evolution during the interwar period yield several lessons in the areas of doctrinal, personnel, and technological development that are applicable to the future employment of joint cyberpower in the post-Afgranistan War era. This book first explores how the culture and biases of the Army, Army Air Corps and Navy influenced the development of interwar theory and doctrine. It then examines airpower development through the lens of personnel, and uses the concepts of the change agent and the heterogeneous engineer to show how airpower development depended on the expertise and political acumen of senior officers who believed in airpower's potential and were determined to make it a reality. Finally, it looks at how the Army Air Corps and the Navy managed uncertainty about the nature of the nation's next war while in an environment marked by rapid technological progress in aviation.

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