Securing Cyber-Physical Systems

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Think about someone taking control of your car while you're driving. Or, someone hacking into a drone and taking control. Both of these things have been done, and both are attacks against cyber-physical systems (CPS). Securing Cyber-Physical Systems explores the cybersecurity needed for CPS, with a focus on results of research and real-world deployment experiences. It addresses CPS across multiple sectors of industry.

CPS emerged from traditional engineered systems in the areas of power and energy, automotive, healthcare, and aerospace. By introducing pervasive communication support in those systems, CPS made the systems more flexible, high-performing, and responsive. In general, these systems are mission-critical—their availability and correct operation is essential. This book focuses on the security of such mission-critical systems.
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GlastopfNG: A Web Attack Honeypot

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Today we find web applications in every environment independent of a company's size and even in home networks. This fact made web applications also attractive to cyber criminals as there are new attack vectors like Cross Site Scripting, Remote File Inclusions (RFI) and SQL Injections. Such so called web based attacks can be found on every vulnerability statistic because of these attacks are so widespread. Criminals not only break into web applications, they also overtake whole web servers which than can become part of a botnet or even become a command and control server of such. GlastopfNG, is a honeypot specialized on simulating a vulnerable web server/application to become a target of automated or even manual attack. Instead of trying to block these attacks Glastopf tries to get as much information as possible about the attacker and the used attack itself. This gathered information can then be used in different ways to protect real applications in the future against such attacks.

How to Find Out Anything: From Extreme Google Searches to Scouring Government Documents, a Guide to Uncovering Anything About Everyone and Everything

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In How to Find Out Anything, master researcher Don MacLeod explains how to find what you're looking for quickly, efficiently, and accurately—and how to avoid the most common mistakes of the Google Age.

Not your average research book, How to Find Out Anything shows you how to unveil nearly anything about anyone. From top CEO’s salaries to police records, you’ll learn little-known tricks for discovering the exact information you’re looking for. You’ll learn:
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Cybersecurity – Essentials: Institutions, Instruments, Types and Forms

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This paper examines the phenomenon of cybercrime, as a serious hazard of new, digital society. Different forms of cybercrime are described, accompanied with up-to-date statistical data. Focus is put on available international legal framework as well as on the major institutional bodies – state or non-governmental – aimed to achieve security in cyberspace. The authors also attempt to evaluate the costs of particular cyber, criminal activities whereas basic ethical issues regarding piracy are also examined. Finally, this work end with the study case elaborating the cyber issue in the Central Asian Republics (Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan).

Ruling the Root: Internet Governance and the Taming of Cyberspace

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In Ruling the Root, Milton Mueller uses the theoretical framework of institutional
economics to analyze the global policy and governance problems created by the assignment of Internet
domain names and addresses. "The root" is the top of the domain name hierarchy and the Internet
address space. It is the only point of centralized control in what is otherwise a distributed and
voluntaristic network of networks. Both domain names and IP numbers are valuable resources, and
their assignment on a coordinated basis is essential to the technical operation of the Internet.
Mueller explains how control of the root is being leveraged to control the Internet itself in such
key areas as trademark and copyright protection, surveillance of users, content regulation, and
regulation of the domain name supply industry.Control of the root originally resided in an
informally organized technical elite comprised mostly of American computer scientists. As the
Internet became commercialized and domain name registration became a profitable business, a six-year
struggle over property rights and the control of the root broke out among Internet technologists,
business and intellectual property interests, international organizations, national governments, and
advocates of individual rights. By the late 1990s, it was apparent that only a new international
institution could resolve conflicts among the factions in the domain name wars. Mueller recounts the
fascinating process that led to the formation of a new international regime around ICANN, the
Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers. In the process, he shows how the vaunted
freedom and openness of the Internet is being diminished by the institutionalization of the
root.