Cyber Warriors at War

Cyber Warriors at WarDr. Berg P. Hyacinthe (PhD, Florida State University; LLD Candidate, Assas School of Law, CERSA-CNRS, La Sorbonne) is internationally recognized as an eminent and multidisciplinary scientific investigator. A U.S. patent holder featured in Harvard's Smithsonian/NASA Astrophysics Data System, Dr. Hyacinthe recently served as Assistant Professor and Scientific Advisor to Taibah University's Strategic Science & Advanced Technology Unit. Dr. Hyacinthe held several positions at County and State levels of the U.S Government in the Information Technology arena. He has been featured in conferences held at the U.S. Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey (author); Defence Academy of the United Kingdom, Shrivenham (invited session Chair); and National Defence College, Helsinki (session Chair). In CYBER WARRIORS AT WAR, he draws on the triangular relationship between technology, law, and Information Age warfare to propose solutions against potential charges of having committed Information Operations (IO) war crimes and/or IO crimes against humanity. According to Dr. Hyacinthe, the success of pre-emptive strikes and decisive military operations depends profoundly upon both reliable human intelligence and the versatile skills of 21st century “cyber warriors” whose IO activities are conducted through modern warfare's pentagonal synchrony – land, sea, air, cyberspace, and outer space. Unfortunately, these operations are commonly effectuated under a legal reasoning that is ambiguous in important ways: a threat to the national security of the United States of America and to the entire international community. Hence, as this Essay argues, the evolution of modern computer systems as weapons of war compels wary jurists to turn to the laws that should govern development and use of lethal information technologies. Further, this Essay examines how certain military operations within Information Warfare (IW) require new legal framework, and recounts specific events involving various types of IW conduct and cyber attack: an interesting exposé to jurists, military personnel, policymakers, and the growing and diverse body of information professionals around the world.

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Cyberwar 3.0: Human Factors in Information Operations and Future Conflict

Cyberwar 3.0: Human Factors in Information Operations and Future ConflictWarfare and conflict are no longer just about the clash of uniformed armies and their cutting-edge technology. Conflict in the Information Age is about ideas, values, aspirations, fears and the struggle of people for identity. How will humankind define and wage war in the Infosphere? This book is about a journey into a new place that we have yet to define. It is offered by thinkers in the forefront of American and British government, academic, military, and private industry. Here are some of the issues examined:

• Is Infowar real?
• Who will defend cyberspace?
• What are Information Operations?
• Can and should the military patrol the information highway?
• What are the legal, ethical and moral issues?
• Will information decrease or add to the fog of war?
•Can we safely outsource national security?
• What did Kosovo teach us?
• How would Sun Tzu have employed information war?
• How real is the Insider Threat?
• What is the psychology of future war?
• Will technology be master or servant?
• Can perceptions be managed in peace, crisis and war?
• Who should protect critical infrastructures and how?
• What is the information content in National Security Strategy?

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Securing SCADA Systems

Securing SCADA Systems Bestselling author Ron Krutz once again demonstrates his ability to make difficult security topics approachable with this first in-depth look at SCADA (Supervisory Control And Data Acquisition) systems

  • Krutz discusses the harsh reality that natural gas pipelines, nuclear plants, water systems, oil refineries, and other industrial facilities are vulnerable to a terrorist or disgruntled employee causing lethal accidents and millions of dollars of damage-and what can be done to prevent this from happening
  • Examines SCADA system threats and vulnerabilities, the emergence of protocol standards, and how security controls can be applied to ensure the safety and security of our national infrastructure assets.


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Current and Emerging Trends in Cyber Operations: Policy, Strategy and Practice (Palgrave Macmillan’s Studies in Cybercrime and Cybersecurity)

Amazon Price: $100.00 $70.33 You save: $29.67 (30%). (as of August 19, 2017 05:45 – Details). Product prices and availability are accurate as of the date/time indicated and are subject to change. Any price and availability information displayed on the Amazon site at the time of purchase will apply to the purchase of this product.

The field of cyber operations has seen increasing interest among both academics and professionals in recent years. It encompasses multiple disciplines, which are associated with both the technical and non-technical operations conducted in cyberspace. This book importantly focuses on the non-technical aspects, such as policy, strategy and best practice. In doing so, it presents both theoretical and practical approaches towards understanding the evolution of cyber operations.

Current and Emerging Trends in Cyber Operations provides a multidisciplinary examination of international trends, with contributions from scholars and high-profile practitioners working in the fields of cyber security, cyber warfare, and information management. An international approach is adopted – one that incorporates studies from a military (warfare) context as well as civilian (private industry) environments.
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National Defense Strategy – United States of America

National Defense Strategy - United States of AmericaThe United States, our allies, and our partners face a spectrum of challenges, including violent transnational extremist networks, hostile states armed with weapons of mass destruction, rising regional powers, emerging space and cyber threats, natural and pandemic disasters, and a growing competition for resources. The Department of Defense must respond to these challenges while anticipating and preparing for those of tomorrow. We must balance strategic risk across our responses, making the best use of the tools at hand within the U.S. Government and among our international partners. To succeed, we must harness and integrate all aspects of national power and work closely with a wide range of allies, friends and partners. We cannot prevail if we act alone.

As noted in the 2006 QDR, state actors no longer have a monopoly over the catastrophic use of violence. Small groups or individuals can harness chemical, biological, or even crude radiological or nuclear devices to cause extensive damage and harm. Similarly, they can attack vulnerable points in cyberspace and disrupt commerce and daily life in the United States, causing economic damage, compromising sensitive information and materials, and interrupting critical services such as power and information networks. National security and domestic resources may be at risk, and the Department must help respond to protect lives and national assets. The Department will continue to be both bulwark and active protector in these areas. Yet, in the long run the Department of Defense is neither the best source of resources and capabilities nor the appropriate authority to shoulder these tasks. The comparative advantage, and applicable authorities, for action reside elsewhere in the U.S. Government, at other levels of government, in the private sector, and with partner nations. DoD should expect and plan to play a key supporting role in an interagency effort to combat these threats, and to help develop new capacities and capabilities, while protecting its own vulnerabilities.

In the contemporary strategic environment, the challenge is one of deterring or dissuading a range of potential adversaries from taking a variety of actions against the U.S. and our allies and interests. These adversaries could be states or non-state actors; they could use nuclear, conventional, or unconventional weapons; and they could exploit terrorism, electronic, cyber and other forms of warfare. Economic interdependence and the growth of global communications further complicate the situation. Not only do they blur the types of threats, they also exacerbate sensitivity to the effects of attacks and in some cases make it more difficult to attribute or trace them. Finally, the number of potential adversaries, the breadth of their capabilities, and the need to design approaches to deterrence for each, create new challenges.

An underlying assumption in our understanding of the strategic environment is that the predominant near-term challenges to the United States will come from state and non-state actors using irregular and catastrophic capabilities. Although our advanced space and cyber-space assets give us unparalleled advantages on the traditional battlefield, they also entail vulnerabilities.

China is developing technologies to disrupt our traditional advantages. Examples include development of anti-satellite capabilities and cyber warfare. Other actors, particularly non-state actors, are developing asymmetric tactics, techniques, and procedures that seek to avoid situations where our advantages come into play.

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