CyberWar

Si Vis Pacem, Para Bellum

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Understanding Dark Networks: A Strategic Framework for the Use of Social Network Analysis

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Dark networks are the illegal and covert networks (e.g, insurgents, jihadi groups, or drug cartels) that security and intelligence analysts must track and identify to be able to disrupt and dismantle them. This text explains how this can be done by using the Social Network Analysis (SNA) method. Written in an accessible manner, it provides an introduction to SNA, presenting tools and concepts, and showing how SNA can inform the crafting of a wide array of strategies for the tracking and disrupting of dark networks.

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The Use of Force: Military Power and International Politics

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The Use of Force, long considered a classic in its own right, brings together enduring, influential works on the role of military power in foreign policy and international politics. Now in its eighth edition, the reader has been significantly revised; with twenty innovative and up-to-date selections, this edition is 60 percent new. Meticulously chosen and edited by leading scholars Robert J. Art and Kelly M. Greenhill, the selections are grouped under three headings: theories, case studies, and contemporary issues. The first section includes essays that cover the security dilemma, terrorism, the sources of military doctrine, the nuclear revolution, and the fungibility of force. A new subsection of Part I also deals with ethical issues in the use of force. The second section includes case studies in the use of force that span the period from World War I through the war in Afghanistan. The final section considers issues concerning the projection of US military power; the rising power of China; the spread of biological and nuclear weapons and cyberwarfare; intervention in internal conflicts and insurgencies; and possible future developments in terrorism, nuclear abolition, and robotic warfare. Continuing the tradition of previous editions, this fully updated reader collects the best analysis by influential thinkers on the use of force in international affairs.

Contributions by: Bruce J. Allyn, Kenneth Anderson, Robert J. Art, Mark S. Bell, Richard K. Betts, Laurie R. Blank, James G. Blight, Stephen G. Brooks, Seyom Brown, Daniel Byman, Audrey Kurth Cronin, Patrick M. Cronin, Alexander B. Downes, Karl W. Eikenberry, John Lewis Gaddis, Erik Gartke, Alexander L. George, Avery Goldstein, Kelly M. Greenhill, G. John Ikenberry, Robert Jervis, Gregory Koblentz, Peter R. Mansoor, John J. Mearsheimer, Nicholas L. Miller, Louis C. Morton, Barry R. Posen, Louise Richardson, George B. Samson, Thomas C. Schelling, Jack L. Snyder, Paul Staniland, Barbara F. Walter, Kenneth N. Waltz, Matthew Waxman, David A. Welch, Jon Western, and William C. Wohlforth.

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Privacy in the Age of Big Data: Recognizing Threats, Defending Your Rights, and Protecting Your Family

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Digital data collection and surveillance gets more pervasive and invasive by the day; but the best ways to protect yourself and your data are all steps you can take yourself. The devices we use to get just-in-time coupons, directions when we’re lost, and maintain connections with loved ones no matter how far away they are, also invade our privacy in ways we might not even be aware of. Our devices send and collect data about us whenever we use them, but that data is not safeguarded the way we assume it would be.

Privacy is complex and personal. Many of us do not know the full extent to which data is collected, stored, aggregated, and used. As recent revelations indicate, we are subject to a level of data collection and surveillance never before imaginable. While some of these methods may, in fact, protect us and provide us with information and services we deem to be helpful and desired, others can turn out to be insidious and over-arching.
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Privacy in the Age of Big Data: Recognizing Threats, Defending Your Rights, and Protecting Your Family

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Digital devices have made our busy lives a little easier and they do great things for us, too – we get just-in-time coupons, directions, and connection with loved ones while stuck on an airplane runway. Yet, these devices, though we love them, can invade our privacy in ways we are not even aware of. The digital devices send and collect data about us whenever we use them, but that data is not always safeguarded the way we assume it should be to protect our privacy. Privacy is complex and personal. Many of us do not know the full extent to which data is collected, stored, aggregated, and used. As recent revelations indicate, we are subject to a level of data collection and surveillance never before imaginable. While some of these methods may, in fact, protect us and provide us with information and services we deem to be helpful and desired, others can turn out to be insidious and over-arching.

Privacy in the Age of Big Data highlights the many positive outcomes of digital surveillance and data collection while also outlining those forms of data collection to which we do not always consent, and of which we are likely unaware, as well as the dangers inherent in such surveillance and tracking. Payton and Claypoole skillfully introduce readers to the many ways we are “watched” and how to change behaviors and activities to recapture and regain more of our privacy. The authors suggest remedies from tools, to behavior changes, to speaking out to politicians to request their privacy back. Anyone who uses digital devices for any reason will want to read this book for its clear and no-nonsense approach to the world of big data and what it means for all of us.

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Cybersecurity and Human Rights in the Age of Cyberveillance

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Cybersecurity and Human Rights in the Age of Cyberveillance is a collection of articles by distinguished authors from the US and Europe and presents a contemporary perspectives on the limits online of human rights. By considering the latest political events and case law, including the NSA PRISM surveillance program controversy, the planned EU data protection amendments, and the latest European Court of Human Rights jurisprudence, it provides an analysis of the ongoing legal discourse on global cyberveillance.

Using examples from contemporary state practice, including content filtering and Internet shutdowns during the Arab Spring as well as the PRISM controversy, the authors identify limits of state and third party interference with individual human rights of Internet users. Analysis is based on existing human rights standards, as enshrined within international law including the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, European Convention on Human Rights and recommendations from the Human Rights Council. The definition of human rights, perceived as freedoms and liberties guaranteed to every human being by international legal consensus will be presented based on the rich body on international law.
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