CyberWar

Si Vis Pacem, Para Bellum

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The Expanding Cyber Threat

Reports of cyber criminals, “hacktivists” and nation-states accessing sensitive information and disrupting services in both the public and private domains have risen steadily, heightening concerns over the adequacy of cybersecurity measures. Cybersecurity related concerns range from spearfishing attempts and spam, to malware, to illegal or illicit activity on the dark net. More and more cases of successful cyber-attacks are being reported. Financial information, medical records, any and all personal data maintained on computer systems by individuals or by organizations large and small are vulnerable. Mobile, wireless technology presents new opportunities for cyber-attacks. As more devices communicate with one another, from security systems to thermostats, the “Internet of Things” presents a growing target. Social media sites and advertisements also present opportunities for cybersecurity breaches.

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Cybersecurity Essentials

An accessible introduction to cybersecurity concepts and practices

Cybersecurity Essentials provides a comprehensive introduction to the field, with expert coverage of essential topics required for entry-level cybersecurity certifications. An effective defense consists of four distinct challenges: securing the infrastructure, securing devices, securing local networks, and securing the perimeter. Overcoming these challenges requires a detailed understanding of the concepts and practices within each realm. This book covers each challenge individually for greater depth of information, with real-world scenarios that show what vulnerabilities look like in everyday computing scenarios. Each part concludes with a summary of key concepts, review questions, and hands-on exercises, allowing you to test your understanding while exercising your new critical skills.
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Cyber Attack

There are an estimated 8.7 billion devices currently connected to the Internet – and each one is a threat to its owner. Computers and computer systems rule our lives, and it is impossible to imagine life without them. But as society has become evermore dependent, both economically and politically, on the electronic flow of information, it has made us vulnerable to the real and destabilizing threat of cyber attack – the extremes of which could see us having to exist without power, vital resources and communications. Confronting this terrifying reality, Cyber Attack explores the digital dangers we face and examines the extremes they could reach. The book also investigates who is responsible and what can be done to protect us. Cyber Attack is written by bestselling author Paul Day, a former hacker turned leading computer security expert, and covers all areas of digital menace. What you learn in this book will make you think again next time you make an online transaction or send sensitive information from your smart phone.

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Kismet Hacking

Kismet is the industry standard for examining wireless network traffic, and is used by over 250,000 security professionals, wireless networking enthusiasts, and WarDriving hobbyists.

Unlike other wireless networking books that have been published in recent years that geared towards Windows users, Kismet Hacking is geared to those individuals that use the Linux operating system. People who use Linux and want to use wireless tools need to use Kismet. Now with the introduction of Kismet NewCore, they have a book that will answer all their questions about using this great tool. This book continues in the successful vein of books for wireless users such as WarDriving: Drive, Detect Defend.
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Creeping Failure: How We Broke the Internet and What We Can Do to Fix It

The Internet is often called a superhighway, but it may be more analogous to a city: an immense tangle of streets, highways, and interchanges, lined with homes and businesses, playgrounds and theatres. We may not physically live in this city, but most of us spend a lot of time there, and even pay rents and fees to hold property in it.

But the Internet is not a city of the 21st century. Jeffrey Hunker, an internationally known expert in cyber-security and counter-terrorism policy, argues that the Internet of today is, in many ways, equivalent to the burgeoning cities of the early Industrial Revolution: teeming with energy but also with new and previously unimagined dangers, and lacking the technical and political infrastructures to deal with these problems. In a world where change of our own making has led to unexpected consequences, why have we failed, at our own peril, to address these consequences?
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