Safeguarding Infrastructure Assets from Cyber-terrorism: Measuring and Protecting SCADA

Safeguarding Infrastructure Assets from Cyber-terrorism: Measuring and Protecting SCADA systems from Cyber-terrorists in AustraliaTerrorist groups are currently using information and communication technologies to orchestrate their conventional attacks. More recently, terrorists have been developing a new form of cyber-capability to coordinate cyber attacks. This book explores the possibility that cyber-terrorists may have developed or may have future capabilities to attack critical infrastructure by accessing Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems within Australia and throughout the world. The book characterises the Australian security and terrorism environment and discusses the vulnerability of Australian computer systems and control systems. It also discusses the cyber-capability of various terrorist groups, SCADA risk evaluation methods and presents a framework to measure and protect SCADA systems from the threat of cyber-terrorism within Australia. This framework forms the main basis of this research and is examined by three focus group interviews, signifying the need for new counter-terrorism security models to assist with assessing new cyber security threats such as cyber-terrorism. This contribution is of great value to the SCADA community and organisations.

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The Advent of Netwar

The Advent of NetwarThe information revolution is leading to the rise of network forms of organization, with unusual implications for how societies are organized and conflicts are conducted. “Netwar” is an emerging consequence. The term refers to societal conflict and crime, short of war, in which the antagonists are organized more as sprawling “leaderless” networks than as tight-knit hierarchies. Many terrorists, criminals, fundamentalists, and ethno-nationalists are developing netwar capabilities. A new generation of revolutionaries and militant radicals is also emerging, with new doctrines, strategies, and technologies that support their reliance on network forms of organization. Netwar may be the dominant mode of societal conflict in the 21st century. These conclusions are implied by the evolution of societies, according to a framework presented in this RAND study. The emergence of netwar raises the need to rethink strategy and doctrine to conduct counternetwar. Traditional notions of war and low-intensity conflict as a sequential process based on massing, maneuvering, and fighting will likely prove inadequate to cope with nonlinear, swarm-like, information-age conflicts in which societal and military elements are closely intermingled.

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Computer Attack and Cyberterrorism

Computer Attack and CyberterrorismMany international terrorist groups now actively use computers and the Internet to communicate, and several may develop or acquire the necessary technical skills to direct a co-ordinated attack against computers in the United States. A cyberattack intended to harm the U.S. economy would likely target computers that operate the civilian critical infrastructure and government agencies. However, there is disagreement among some observers about whether a co-ordinated cyberattack against the U.S. critical infrastructure could be extremely harmful, or even whether computers operating the civilian critical infrastructure actually offer an effective target for furthering terrorists' goals. While there is no published evidence that terrorist organizations are currently planning a co-ordinated attack against computers, computer system vulnerabilities persist world-wide, and initiators of the random cyberattacks that plague computers on the Internet remain largely unknown. Reports from security organisations show that random attacks are now increasingly implemented through use of automated tools, called ‘bots', that direct large numbers of compromised computers to launch attacks through the Internet as swarms. The growing trend toward the use of more automated attack tools has also overwhelmed some of the current methodologies used for tracking Internet cyberattacks. This book provides background information for three types of attacks against computers (cyberattack, physical attack, and electromagnetic attack), and discusses related vulnerabilities for each type of attack.The book also describes the possible effects of a co-ordinated cyberattack, or computer network attack (CNA), against U.S. infrastructure computers, along with possible technical capabilities of international terrorists. Issues for Congress may include how could trends in cyberattacks be measured more effectively; what is appropriate guidance for DOD use of cyberweapons; should cybersecurity be combined with, or remain separate from, the physical security organization within DHS; how can commercial vendors be encouraged to improve the security of their products; and what are options to encourage U.S. citizens to follow better cybersecurity practices. Appendices to this book describe computer viruses, spyware, and ‘bot networks', and how malicious programs are used to enable cybercrime and cyberespionage. Also, similarities are drawn between planning tactics currently used by computer hackers and those used by terrorists groups for conventional attacks.

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iWar: War and Peace in the Information Age

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New York Times bestselling author and veteran Washington Times columnist explains how the United States can beat China, Russia, Iran, and ISIS in the coming information-technology wars.

America is at war, but most of its citizens don’t know it.
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Networks and Netwars: The Future of Terror, Crime, and Militancy

Networks and Netwars: The Future of Terror, Crime, and MilitancyNetwar-like cyberwar-describes a new spectrum of conflict that is emerging in the wake of the information revolution. Netwar includes conflicts waged, on the one hand, by terrorists, criminals, gangs, and ethnic extremists; and by civil-society activists (such as cyber activists or WTO protestors) on the other. What distinguishes netwar is the networked organizational structure of its practitioners-with many groups actually being leaderless-and their quickness in coming together in swarming attacks. To confront this new type of conflict, it is crucial for governments, military, and law enforcement to begin networking themselves.




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