Dominance Over OmniDimensional Battlespace: Network Centric Warfare as Polemos

Dominance Over OmniDimensional Battlespace: Network Centric Warfare as PolemosThroughout the centuries much debate has been made over the practice of War, the procedures that create the circumstances which lead to its employment, and the questioning of its inevitability in the contemporary world. Traditional warfighting has changed in the 1990s due to the rapid development of ICTs, leading into a whole new generation of warfare. The military must adapt or fail. Exponential increases in the availability of information are leading to an era of cheap information available to anyone, anywhere and the emergence of Network Centric Operations. This will vastly change the nature of the battlespaces and the nature of war itself. This whole procedure goes under the name of “Force Transformation” and has as an utter goal the Dominance over the Full Spectrum of Operations. So, the question to ponder is “Can Transformation be managed and if yes, how?”

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Information Warfare: How to Survive Cyber Attacks

Information Warfare: How to Survive Cyber AttacksAnother release in our popular “Computer World: Books for IT Leaders” series, Information Warfare explains the methodologies behind hacks and cyber attacks and provides defensive strategies and counter measures designed to help companies survive infrastructure attacks, military conflicts, competitive intelligence gathering, economic warfare, and corporate espionage. The authors are renowned industry experts–Michael Erbschloe has connections with the government and is known for his analysis of The Love Bug.





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America the Vulnerable: Inside the New Threat Matrix of Digital Espionage, Crime, and Warfare

America the Vulnerable: Inside the New Threat Matrix of Digital Espionage, Crime, and WarfareA former top-level National Security Agency insider goes behind the headlines to explore America's next great battleground: digital security. An urgent wake-up call that identifies our foes; unveils their methods; and charts the dire consequences for government, business, and individuals.

Shortly after 9/11, Joel Brenner entered the inner sanctum of American espionage, first as the inspector general of the National Security Agency, then as the head of counterintelligence for the director of national intelligence. He saw at close range the battleground on which our adversaries are now attacking us-cyberspace. We are at the mercy of a new generation of spies who operate remotely from China, the Middle East, Russia, even France, among many other places. These operatives have already shown their ability to penetrate our power plants, steal our latest submarine technology, rob our banks, and invade the Pentagon‘s secret communications systems.

Incidents like the WikiLeaks posting of secret U.S. State Department cables hint at the urgency of this problem, but they hardly reveal its extent or its danger. Our government and corporations are a “glass house,” all but transparent to our adversaries. Counterfeit computer chips have found their way into our fighter aircraft; the Chinese stole a new radar system that the navy spent billions to develop; our own soldiers used intentionally corrupted thumb drives to download classified intel from laptops in Iraq. And much more.

Dispatches from the corporate world are just as dire. In 2008, hackers lifted customer files from the Royal Bank of Scotland and used them to withdraw $9 million in half an hour from ATMs in the United States, Britain, and Canada. If that was a traditional heist, it would be counted as one of the largest in history. Worldwide, corporations lose on average $5 million worth of intellectual property apiece annually, and big companies lose many times that.

The structure and culture of the Internet favor spies over governments and corporations, and hackers over privacy, and we've done little to alter that balance. Brenner draws on his extraordinary background to show how to right this imbalance and bring to cyberspace the freedom, accountability, and security we expect elsewhere in our lives.

In America the Vulnerable, Brenner offers a chilling and revelatory appraisal of the new faces of war and espionage-virtual battles with dangerous implications for government, business, and all of us.

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Cyberwar: Point. Click. Destroy (Issues in Focus)

Cyberwar: Point. Click. Destroy (Issues in Focus)This digital document is an article from National Defense, published by National Defense Industrial Association on December 1, 2009. The length of the article is 2442 words. The page length shown above is based on a typical 300-word page. The article is delivered in HTML format and is available immediately after purchase. You can view it with any web browser.

Citation Details
Title: The unseen cyber-war: national-security infrastructure faces relentless cyberespionage campaign.(Cover story)
Author: Austin Wright
Publication: National Defense (Magazine/Journal)
Date: December 1, 2009
Publisher: National Defense Industrial Association
Volume: 94 Issue: 673 Page: 28(5)

Article Type: Cover story

Distributed by Gale, a part of Cengage Learning

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Information Warfare, Cyber-Terrorism and Community Values

Information Warfare, Cyber-Terrorism and Community ValuesThis is a AIR FORCE INST OF TECH WRIGHT-PATTERSONAFB OH report procured by the Pentagon and made available for public release. It has been reproduced in the best form available to the Pentagon. It is not spiral-bound, but rather assembled with Velobinding in a soft, white linen cover. The Storming Media report number is A017014. The abstract provided by the Pentagon follows: Information Warfare involves the attack and defense of information and information systems, both in time of armed conflict and in operations short of war. While information technology provides the promise of a new class of less lethal military instruments, it also presents vulnerabilities occasioned by widespread dependence on an increasingly complex and interconnected global information infrastructure. These vulnerabilities, when exploited by those who would target civilians in order to inspire widespread fear in hopes of accomplishing a political agenda, can be understood as cyberterrorism. As information warfare techniques evolve, those employing them should look to several relevant sources for normative guidance. Relevant, internationally shared values can be found in international custom, the U.N. Charter, treaties dealing with the subject of “cybercrime,” those governing the communication media likely to be utilized by information warriors, UNGA Resolutions and those treaties and customary norms that make up the Law of Armed Conflict.

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