The Chinese Information War: Espionage, Cyberwar, Communications Control and Related Threats to United States Interests

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This book is about a cyberwar with China. This new type of war, says the author, is China's effort at bending another country's will to its own. It is clever, broadly applied, successful, and aimed directly at the United States. This war is neither conventional nor accidental. The U.S. military is at a disadvantage because it is part of a system of government that is democratic, decentralized and mostly separated from American businesses. This system has served the country well but is not a path that China sees as worth following. This book is not a "how to" book of strategies that might be developed to fight a cyberwar. It is a way to grasp and categorize what the Chinese are already doing, to make sense of it. Until the U.S. sees itself as in a war, it cannot begin to effectively prosecute it.

Whistleblowing: Wikileaks, Whistleblower in Washington, Ridenhour Prizes

Whistleblowing: Wikileaks, Whistleblower in Washington, Ridenhour PrizesChapters: Wikileaks, Whistleblower Week in Washington, Murder in Samarkand, Touch All Policy, the Ridenhour Prizes. Source: Wikipedia. Pages: 41. Not illustrated. Free updates online. Purchase includes a free trial membership in the publisher's book club where you can select from more than a million books without charge. Excerpt: Wikileaks is a Sweden-based organization that publishes anonymous submissions and leaks of sensitive documents from governments and other organizations, while preserving the anonymity of their sources. Its website, launched in 2006, is run by The Sunshine Press. The organization has stated it was founded by Chinese dissidents, as well as journalists, mathematicians, and start-up company technologists from the U.S., Taiwan, Europe, Australia, and South Africa. Newspaper articles describe Julian Assange, an Australian journalist and Internet activist, as its director. Within a year of its launch, the site said its database had grown to more than 1.2 million documents. It has won a number of new media awards for its reports. Citing fundraising problems, Wikileaks temporarily suspended all operations other than submission of material in December 2009. Material that was previously published is no longer available, although some can still be accessed on unofficial mirrors. Wikileaks said it would resume full operation once the operational costs were covered, and on 3 February 2010 it announced that its minimum fundraising goal had been achieved. The site's archive came back online in May 2010. Wikileaks went public in January 2007, when it first appeared on the web. The site states that it was “founded by Chinese dissidents, journalists, mathematicians and start-up company technologists, from the US, Taiwan, Europe, Australia and South Africa”. The creators of Wikileaks were unidentified as of January 2007, although it has been represented in public since January 2007.

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Green Dam Youth Escort – Internet Censorship in the People’s Republic of China

Internet Censorship in the People's Republic of China, Green Dam Youth EscortChapters: Internet Censorship in the People's Republic of China, Green Dam Youth Escort (绿坝·花季护航), Blocking of Wikipedia by the People's Republic of China, List of Websites Blocked in the People's Republic of China, Golden Shield Project, War of Internet Addiction, List of Words Censored by Search Engines in the People's Republic of China, History of Internet Censorship in the People's Republic of China, Very Erotic Very Violent, 50 Cent Party, List of Internet Phenomena in the People's Republic of China, Big Mama, Elgoog. Excerpt: 50 Cent Party (Chinese : ; pinyin : W máo D ng), also called 50 Cent Army , refers to paid astroturfing internet commentators working for the People's Republic of China , whose role is posting comments favorable towards the government policies to skew the public opinion on various Internet message boards. They are named after the 50 Chinese cents, or 5 mao, they are paid per such post, other names are red vests , red vanguard and the Five Mao Party . Conservative estimates put the strength of the 50 Cents Army at tens of thousands while other estimates put their numbers as high as 280,000 300,000. Their activities were described by Chinese President Hu Jintao as “a new pattern of public-opinion guidance”. They operate primarily in Chinese, but English language posts appear as well. Their effect is most felt at the domestic Chinese-language websites, bulletin board systems , and chatrooms . Their role is to steer the discussion away from anti-party articulations, politically sensitive or “unacceptable” content and advance the party line of the Communist Party of China . It has been argued that it is not so much censorship but a public relations tactic. According to the Indian Daily News and Analysis , “to this day, anyone who posts a blatantly propagandist pro-Communist …

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Access Controlled: The Shaping of Power, Rights, and Rule in Cyberspace

Access Controlled: The Shaping of Power, Rights, and Rule in Cyberspace (Information Revolution and Global Politics)Internet filtering, censorship of Web content, and online surveillance are increasing in scale, scope, and sophistication around the world, in democratic countries as well as in authoritarian states. The first generation of Internet controls consisted largely of building firewalls at key Internet gateways; China's famous Great Firewall of China is one of the first national Internet filtering systems. Today the new tools for Internet controls that are emerging go beyond mere denial of information. These new techniques, which aim to normalize (or even legalize) Internet control, include targeted viruses and the strategically timed deployment of distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks, surveillance at key points of the Internet's infrastructure, take-down notices, stringent terms of usage policies, and national information shaping strategies. Access Controlled reports on this new normative terrain.

The book, a project from the OpenNet Initiative (ONI), a collaboration of the Citizen Lab at the University of Toronto's Munk Centre for International Studies, Harvard's Berkman Center for Internet and Society, and the SecDev Group, offers six substantial chapters that analyze Internet control in both Western and Eastern Europe and a section of shorter regional reports and country profiles drawn from material gathered by the ONI around the world through a combination of technical interrogation and field research methods.

Chapter authors: Ronald Deibert, Colin Maclay, John Palfrey, Hal Roberts, Rafal Rohozinski, Nart Villeneuve, Ethan Zuckerman

Information Revolution and Global Politics series

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Chinese Cyber Nationalism: Evolution, Characteristics, and Implications

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Chinese Cyber Nationalism offers the first comprehensive examination of the social and ideological movement that mixes Confucian cultural traditions and advanced media technology. Over the past decade, the Internet has increasingly become a communication center, organizational platform, and channel of execution by which Chinese nationalistic causes have been promoted throughout the world. Dr. Xu Wu chronicles the movement's evolutionary path through five distinct developing phases that cover the span of twelve years. Through the use of online surveys and in-depth interviews with foreign policy makers, nationalist webmasters, and leading intellectuals in China, this book analyzes the characteristics and political implications of the movement. Xu presents a unique framework for scholars to understand China's modernization and historic return onto the world stage. Chinese Cyber Nationalism is a important addition to the study of political communication and China's foreign policy.