Informationskrieg und Cyber War

The global reliance on computers, networks and systems continues to grow. As our dependency grows so do the threats that target our military s Command, Control, Communications, Computers, Intelligence, Surveillance, Reconnaissance (C4ISR) systems as well as the operational components and electronic controls for our critical infrastructure. Over the past decade we have experienced a substantial rise in the complexity and sophistication of cyber attacks as well as a frightening increase in the impact of some of the attacks. Every computer is a potential cyber weapon waiting to be loaded and used by extremists, criminals, terrorists and rogue nation states. As the world becomes more and more dependent on computers and information technology, the greater the risk of cyber attacks. Government and military leaders now face this fact and our critical systems and infrastructure remain at great risk! This risk has made the ability to defend these critical systems and direct cyber attacks core capabilities required for the modern military. In the age of cyber conflict, leaders need to understand the weapons and strategies used to wage this rapidly evolving type of warfare. This handbook will provide the background needed to understand the new world of cyber warfare, define the tools and techniques for offensive and defensive action, and provide insight into the strategies behind building a dynamic and relevant cyber warfare capability.

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National Defense Strategy – United States of America

National Defense Strategy - United States of AmericaThe United States, our allies, and our partners face a spectrum of challenges, including violent transnational extremist networks, hostile states armed with weapons of mass destruction, rising regional powers, emerging space and cyber threats, natural and pandemic disasters, and a growing competition for resources. The Department of Defense must respond to these challenges while anticipating and preparing for those of tomorrow. We must balance strategic risk across our responses, making the best use of the tools at hand within the U.S. Government and among our international partners. To succeed, we must harness and integrate all aspects of national power and work closely with a wide range of allies, friends and partners. We cannot prevail if we act alone.

As noted in the 2006 QDR, state actors no longer have a monopoly over the catastrophic use of violence. Small groups or individuals can harness chemical, biological, or even crude radiological or nuclear devices to cause extensive damage and harm. Similarly, they can attack vulnerable points in cyberspace and disrupt commerce and daily life in the United States, causing economic damage, compromising sensitive information and materials, and interrupting critical services such as power and information networks. National security and domestic resources may be at risk, and the Department must help respond to protect lives and national assets. The Department will continue to be both bulwark and active protector in these areas. Yet, in the long run the Department of Defense is neither the best source of resources and capabilities nor the appropriate authority to shoulder these tasks. The comparative advantage, and applicable authorities, for action reside elsewhere in the U.S. Government, at other levels of government, in the private sector, and with partner nations. DoD should expect and plan to play a key supporting role in an interagency effort to combat these threats, and to help develop new capacities and capabilities, while protecting its own vulnerabilities.

In the contemporary strategic environment, the challenge is one of deterring or dissuading a range of potential adversaries from taking a variety of actions against the U.S. and our allies and interests. These adversaries could be states or non-state actors; they could use nuclear, conventional, or unconventional weapons; and they could exploit terrorism, electronic, cyber and other forms of warfare. Economic interdependence and the growth of global communications further complicate the situation. Not only do they blur the types of threats, they also exacerbate sensitivity to the effects of attacks and in some cases make it more difficult to attribute or trace them. Finally, the number of potential adversaries, the breadth of their capabilities, and the need to design approaches to deterrence for each, create new challenges.

An underlying assumption in our understanding of the strategic environment is that the predominant near-term challenges to the United States will come from state and non-state actors using irregular and catastrophic capabilities. Although our advanced space and cyber-space assets give us unparalleled advantages on the traditional battlefield, they also entail vulnerabilities.

China is developing technologies to disrupt our traditional advantages. Examples include development of anti-satellite capabilities and cyber warfare. Other actors, particularly non-state actors, are developing asymmetric tactics, techniques, and procedures that seek to avoid situations where our advantages come into play.

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Securing SCADA Systems

Securing SCADA Systems Bestselling author Ron Krutz once again demonstrates his ability to make difficult security topics approachable with this first in-depth look at SCADA (Supervisory Control And Data Acquisition) systems

  • Krutz discusses the harsh reality that natural gas pipelines, nuclear plants, water systems, oil refineries, and other industrial facilities are vulnerable to a terrorist or disgruntled employee causing lethal accidents and millions of dollars of damage-and what can be done to prevent this from happening
  • Examines SCADA system threats and vulnerabilities, the emergence of protocol standards, and how security controls can be applied to ensure the safety and security of our national infrastructure assets.


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Scada: Supervisory Control And Data Acquisition

Scada: Supervisory Control And Data AcquisitionThis digital document is an article from Pipeline & Gas Journal, published by Oildom Publishing Company of Texas, Inc. on February 1, 2009. The length of the article is 2518 words. The page length shown above is based on a typical 300-word page. The article is delivered in HTML format and is available immediately after purchase. You can view it with any web browser.

Citation Details
Title: Political changes, younger workforce on minds of SCADA, telecommunications experts.(Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition)(Greg Vaughn)(Dan Mueller)(Brian Gore )
Author: Gale Reference Team
Publication: Pipeline & Gas Journal (Magazine/Journal)
Date: February 1, 2009
Publisher: Oildom Publishing Company of Texas, Inc.
Volume: 236 Issue: 2 Page: 28(4)

Distributed by Gale, a part of Cengage Learning

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The Cyber Commander’s eHandbook Version 3

CYBER WARFARE: The Cyber Commander's eHandbook Version 3 (The Weaponry and Strategies of Digital Conflict and Cyber War, Version 3 - 296 Page eBook covering Cyber Warfare, Cyber Terrorism, Cyber Tradecraft, Cyber Activism and offensive, defensive actions and intelligence collection.)

The Weaponry and Strategies of Digital Conflict and Cyber War, Version 3, covering Cyber Warfare, Cyber Terrorism, Cyber Tradecraft, Cyber Activism and offensive, defensive actions and intelligence collection.

Cyber warfare, cyber terrorism, cyber espionage and cyber crime are all growing threats. The 2012 Version 3 of the Cyber Commander's eHandbook provides the insight needed to understand the new world of cyber warfare, as well as defines the tools and techniques for offensive and defensive cyber action, and provide cyber intelligence needed to understand the strategies behind building a dynamic and relevant cyber warfare capability.

Table of Contents

Chapter 1 – Introduction
Chapter 2 – Setting the Stage
Chapter 3 – Cyber Espionage
Chapter 4 – Cyber Terrorism
Chapter 5 – Cyber Intelligence
Chapter 6 – Cyber Weapons
Chapter 7 – EMP Devices
Chapter 8 – Attack Process
Chapter 9 – Critical Infrastructure
Chapter 10 – Cyber Doctrine
Chapter 11 – Cyber Infrastructure
Chapter 12 – New Cyber Warfare Models
Chapter 13 – Conclusion

Portions of this book have been republished in 36 different countries with over 100,000 readers.

Our cyber warfare distance learning program is a great companion product!

Course Information: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B003HD06ZG/ref=nosim/cybe0f8-20

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