Segurança e Defesa do Espaço Cibernético Brasileiro

Segurança e Defesa do Espaço Cibernético BrasileiroAos poucos, para enfrentar as necessidades de um mundo globalizado e tomado por redes de informação, o Estado brasileiro viu-se diante de uma série de fatores, em sua própria estrutura, que levou o país a criar uma estratégia, abrigando um modelo de articulação envolvendo todos os órgãos públicos em uma rede complexa, extensiva e intensiva. No livro, o autor comenta os principais passos que levaram o Estado brasileiro a acompanhar o que ocorre no espaço cibernético no país. Com uma linguagem acessível e informações preciosas e didáticas, o autor explica a evolução deste acompanhamento, partindo da sua percepção de que segurança e defesa do espaço cibernético brasileiro, até pouco tempo, não tinha um conjunto de ações e estratégias que validasse o compromisso do país com essa nova etapa de segurança das nações. O livro traz ainda as motivações de cada hacker e os mais diversos tipos de denominações para pessoas que se dedicam, de uma maneira ou de outra, a invadir soberanias institucionais. Raphael Mandarino é um dos primeiros pensadores brasileiros sobre o tema. A análise que desenvolveu neste livro é resultado de anos à frente de atividades que levaram o Brasil a ter um programa estratégico de segurança cibernética. Todo o esforço é para que as iniciativas de segurança da informação sejam uma ação integrada e não isolada.

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The Watchers: The Rise of America’s Surveillance State

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Using exclusive access to key insiders, Shane Harris charts the rise of America's surveillance state over the past twenty-five years and highlights a dangerous paradox: Our government's strategy has made it harder to catch terrorists and easier to spy on the rest of us.

Our surveillance state was born in the brain of Admiral John Poindexter in 1983. Poindexter, Reagan's National Security Advisor, realized that the United States might have prevented the terrorist massacre of 241 Marines in Beirut if only intelligence agencies had been able to analyze in real time data they had on the attackers. Poindexter poured government know-how and funds into his dream-a system that would sift reams of data for signs of terrorist activity. Decades later, that elusive dream still captivates Washington. After the 2001 attacks, Poindexter returned to government with a controversial program, called Total Information Awareness, to detect the next attack. Today it is a secretly funded operation that can gather personal information on every American and millions of others worldwide.
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National Defense Strategy – United States of America

National Defense Strategy - United States of AmericaThe United States, our allies, and our partners face a spectrum of challenges, including violent transnational extremist networks, hostile states armed with weapons of mass destruction, rising regional powers, emerging space and cyber threats, natural and pandemic disasters, and a growing competition for resources. The Department of Defense must respond to these challenges while anticipating and preparing for those of tomorrow. We must balance strategic risk across our responses, making the best use of the tools at hand within the U.S. Government and among our international partners. To succeed, we must harness and integrate all aspects of national power and work closely with a wide range of allies, friends and partners. We cannot prevail if we act alone.

As noted in the 2006 QDR, state actors no longer have a monopoly over the catastrophic use of violence. Small groups or individuals can harness chemical, biological, or even crude radiological or nuclear devices to cause extensive damage and harm. Similarly, they can attack vulnerable points in cyberspace and disrupt commerce and daily life in the United States, causing economic damage, compromising sensitive information and materials, and interrupting critical services such as power and information networks. National security and domestic resources may be at risk, and the Department must help respond to protect lives and national assets. The Department will continue to be both bulwark and active protector in these areas. Yet, in the long run the Department of Defense is neither the best source of resources and capabilities nor the appropriate authority to shoulder these tasks. The comparative advantage, and applicable authorities, for action reside elsewhere in the U.S. Government, at other levels of government, in the private sector, and with partner nations. DoD should expect and plan to play a key supporting role in an interagency effort to combat these threats, and to help develop new capacities and capabilities, while protecting its own vulnerabilities.

In the contemporary strategic environment, the challenge is one of deterring or dissuading a range of potential adversaries from taking a variety of actions against the U.S. and our allies and interests. These adversaries could be states or non-state actors; they could use nuclear, conventional, or unconventional weapons; and they could exploit terrorism, electronic, cyber and other forms of warfare. Economic interdependence and the growth of global communications further complicate the situation. Not only do they blur the types of threats, they also exacerbate sensitivity to the effects of attacks and in some cases make it more difficult to attribute or trace them. Finally, the number of potential adversaries, the breadth of their capabilities, and the need to design approaches to deterrence for each, create new challenges.

An underlying assumption in our understanding of the strategic environment is that the predominant near-term challenges to the United States will come from state and non-state actors using irregular and catastrophic capabilities. Although our advanced space and cyber-space assets give us unparalleled advantages on the traditional battlefield, they also entail vulnerabilities.

China is developing technologies to disrupt our traditional advantages. Examples include development of anti-satellite capabilities and cyber warfare. Other actors, particularly non-state actors, are developing asymmetric tactics, techniques, and procedures that seek to avoid situations where our advantages come into play.

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Securing SCADA Systems

Securing SCADA Systems Bestselling author Ron Krutz once again demonstrates his ability to make difficult security topics approachable with this first in-depth look at SCADA (Supervisory Control And Data Acquisition) systems

  • Krutz discusses the harsh reality that natural gas pipelines, nuclear plants, water systems, oil refineries, and other industrial facilities are vulnerable to a terrorist or disgruntled employee causing lethal accidents and millions of dollars of damage-and what can be done to prevent this from happening
  • Examines SCADA system threats and vulnerabilities, the emergence of protocol standards, and how security controls can be applied to ensure the safety and security of our national infrastructure assets.


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Wiki at War: Conflict in a Socially Networked World

Wiki at War: Conflict in a Socially Networked WorldIn 2011, amid the popular uprising against Egyptian president Hosni Mubarak, the government sought in vain to shut down the Internet-based social networks of its people.

WikiLeaks editor-in-chief Julian Assange has been branded “public enemy number one” by some in the United States for posting material on the World Wide Web that concerns airstrikes in Iraq, US diplomatic communications, and other sensitive matters.
In Wiki at War, James Jay Carafano explains why these and other Internet-born initiatives matter and how they are likely to affect the future face of war, diplomacy, and domestic politics.
“The war for winning dominance over social networks and using that dominance to advantage is already underway,” Carafano writes in this extremely timely analysis of the techno-future of information and the impact of social networking via the Internet. Drawing on his extensive knowledge of history and defense strategy, Carafano creates a cogent analysis of what is truly new about the “new media,” and what is simply a recasting of human warfare in contemporary forms.
Wiki at War is written in a lively, accessible style that will make this technological development comprehensible and engaging for general readers without sacrificing the book’s usefulness to specialists. Outlining the conditions under which a difference in degree becomes a difference in kind, detailing how ancient wisdom can still apply to national security decisions, and examining the conditions under which new expertise is required to wage effective diplomacy or successful military strategy, Carafano casts in stark relief the issues that face political, military, and social leaders in trying to manage and control information, in both the international and domestic arenas. Wiki at War affords stimulating thought about and definitive discussion of this vital emerging topic.

Price: $24.95

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