National Defense Strategy – United States of America

National Defense Strategy - United States of AmericaThe United States, our allies, and our partners face a spectrum of challenges, including violent transnational extremist networks, hostile states armed with weapons of mass destruction, rising regional powers, emerging space and cyber threats, natural and pandemic disasters, and a growing competition for resources. The Department of Defense must respond to these challenges while anticipating and preparing for those of tomorrow. We must balance strategic risk across our responses, making the best use of the tools at hand within the U.S. Government and among our international partners. To succeed, we must harness and integrate all aspects of national power and work closely with a wide range of allies, friends and partners. We cannot prevail if we act alone.

As noted in the 2006 QDR, state actors no longer have a monopoly over the catastrophic use of violence. Small groups or individuals can harness chemical, biological, or even crude radiological or nuclear devices to cause extensive damage and harm. Similarly, they can attack vulnerable points in cyberspace and disrupt commerce and daily life in the United States, causing economic damage, compromising sensitive information and materials, and interrupting critical services such as power and information networks. National security and domestic resources may be at risk, and the Department must help respond to protect lives and national assets. The Department will continue to be both bulwark and active protector in these areas. Yet, in the long run the Department of Defense is neither the best source of resources and capabilities nor the appropriate authority to shoulder these tasks. The comparative advantage, and applicable authorities, for action reside elsewhere in the U.S. Government, at other levels of government, in the private sector, and with partner nations. DoD should expect and plan to play a key supporting role in an interagency effort to combat these threats, and to help develop new capacities and capabilities, while protecting its own vulnerabilities.

In the contemporary strategic environment, the challenge is one of deterring or dissuading a range of potential adversaries from taking a variety of actions against the U.S. and our allies and interests. These adversaries could be states or non-state actors; they could use nuclear, conventional, or unconventional weapons; and they could exploit terrorism, electronic, cyber and other forms of warfare. Economic interdependence and the growth of global communications further complicate the situation. Not only do they blur the types of threats, they also exacerbate sensitivity to the effects of attacks and in some cases make it more difficult to attribute or trace them. Finally, the number of potential adversaries, the breadth of their capabilities, and the need to design approaches to deterrence for each, create new challenges.

An underlying assumption in our understanding of the strategic environment is that the predominant near-term challenges to the United States will come from state and non-state actors using irregular and catastrophic capabilities. Although our advanced space and cyber-space assets give us unparalleled advantages on the traditional battlefield, they also entail vulnerabilities.

China is developing technologies to disrupt our traditional advantages. Examples include development of anti-satellite capabilities and cyber warfare. Other actors, particularly non-state actors, are developing asymmetric tactics, techniques, and procedures that seek to avoid situations where our advantages come into play.

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The Stuxnet Computer Worm and Industrial Control System Security (Defense, Security and Strategies)

The Stuxnet Computer Worm and Industrial Control System Security (Defense, Security and Strategies)In September 2010, media reports emerged about a new form of cyber attack that appeared to target Iran, although the actual target, if any, is unknown. Through the use of thumb drives in computers that were not connected to the Internet, a malicious software program known as Stuxnet infected computer systems that were used to control the functioning of a nuclear power plant. Once inside the system, Stuxnet had the ability to degrade or destroy the software on which it operated. This book examines the discovery of the Stuxnet worm which has raised several issues for Congress, including the effect on national security, what the government's response should be, whether an international treaty to curb the use of malicious software is necessary, and how such a treaty could be implemented.

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The Nature of War in the Information Age: Clausewitzian Future Strategy History

The Nature of War in the Information Age: Clausewitzian Future (Strategy and History)There has been a great deal of speculation recently concerning the likely impact of the ‘Information Age‘ on warfare. In this vein, much of the Revolution in Military Affairs (RMA) literature subscribes to the idea that the Information Age will witness a transformation in the very nature of war. In this book, David Lonsdale puts that notion to the test.

Using a range of contexts, the book sets out to look at whether the classical Clausewitzian theory of the nature of war will retain its validity in this new age. The analysis covers the character of the future battlespace, the function of command, and the much-hyped concept of Strategic Information Warfare. Finally, the book broadens its perspective to examine the nature of ‘Information Power' and its implications for geopolitics. Through an assessment of both historical and contemporary case studies (including the events following September 11 and the recent war in Iraq), the author concludes that although the future will see many changes to the conduct of warfare, the nature of war, as given theoretical form by Clausewitz, will remain essentially unchanged.

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Wars of Disruption and Resilience: Cybered Conflict, Power, and National Security (Studies in Security and International Affairs)

Wars of Disruption and Resilience: Cybered Conflict, Power, and National Security (Studies in Security and International Affairs)Increasingly, the power of a large, complex, wired nation like the United States rests on its ability to disrupt would-be cyber attacks and to be resil­ient against a successful attack or recurring campaign. Addressing the con­cerns of both theorists and those on the national security front lines, Chris C. Demchak presents a unified strategy for survival in an interconnected, ever-messier, more surprising cybered world and examines the institutional adaptations required of our defense, intelligence, energy, and other critical sectors for national security.

Demchak introduces a strategy of “security resilience” against surprise attacks for a cybered world that is divided between modern, digitally vulner­able city-states and more dysfunctional global regions. Its key concepts build on theories of international relations, complexity in social-technical systems, and organizational-institutional adaptation. Demchak tests the strategy for reasonableness in history’s few examples of states disrupting rather than conquering and being resilient to attacks, including ancient Athens and Sparta, several British colonial wars, and two American limited wars. She applies the strategy to modern political, social, and technical challenges and presents three kinds of institutional adaptation that predicate the success of the security resilience strategy in response. Finally, Demchak discusses implications for the future including new forms of cyber aggression like the Stuxnet worm, the rise of the cyber-command concept, and the competition between the U.S. and China as global cyber leaders.

Wars of Disruption and Resilience offers a blueprint for a national cyber-power strategy that is long in time horizon, flexible in target and scale, and practical enough to maintain the security of a digitized nation facing violent cybered conflict.

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Netcat Power Tools

Netcat Power ToolsOriginally released in 1996, Netcat is a netowrking program designed to read and write data across both Transmission Control Protocol TCP and User Datagram Protocol (UDP) connections using the TCP/Internet Protocol (IP) protocol suite. Netcat is often referred to as a “Swiss Army knife” utility, and for good reason. Just like the multi-function usefullness of the venerable Swiss Army pocket knife, Netcat's functionality is helpful as both a standalone program and a backe-end tool in a wide range of applications. Some of the many uses of Netcat include port scanning, transferring files, grabbing banners, port listening and redirection, and more nefariously, a backdoor. This is the only book dedicated to comprehensive coverage of the tool's many features, and by the end of this book, you'll discover how Netcat can be one of the most valuable tools in your arsenal.

* Get Up and Running with Netcat Simple yet powerful…Don't let the trouble-free installation and the easy command line belie the fact that Netcat is indeed a potent and powerful program.
* Go PenTesting with Netcat Master Netcat's port scanning and service identification capabilities as well as obtaining Web server application information. Test and verify outbound firewall rules and avoid detection by using antivirus software and the Window Firewall. Also, create a backdoor using Netcat.
* Conduct Enumeration and Scanning with Netcat, Nmap, and More! Netcat's not the only game in town…Learn the process of network of enumeration and scanning, and see how Netcat along with other tools such as Nmap and Scanrand can be used to thoroughly identify all of the assets on your network.
* Banner Grabbing with Netcat Banner grabbing is a simple yet highly effective method of gathering information about a remote target, and can be performed with relative ease with the Netcat utility.
* Explore the Dark Side of Netcat See the various ways Netcat has been used to provide malicious, unauthorized access to their targets. By walking through these methods used to set up backdoor access and circumvent protection mechanisms through the use of Netcat, we can understand how malicious hackers obtain and maintain illegal access. Embrace the dark side of Netcat, so that you may do good deeds later.
* Transfer Files Using Netcat The flexability and simple operation allows Netcat to fill a niche when it comes to moving a file or files in a quick and easy fashion. Encryption is provided via several different avenues including integrated support on some of the more modern Netcat variants, tunneling via third-party tools, or operating system integrated IPsec policies.
* Troubleshoot Your Network with Netcat Examine remote systems using Netat's scanning ability. Test open ports to see if they really are active and see what protocls are on those ports. Communicate with different applications to determine what problems might exist, and gain insight into how to solve these problems.
* Sniff Traffic within a System Use Netcat as a sniffer within a system to collect incoming and outgoing data. Set up Netcat to listen at ports higher than 1023 (the well-known ports), so you can use Netcat even as a normal user.

* Comprehensive introduction to the #4 most popular open source security tool available
* Tips and tricks on the legitimate uses of Netcat
* Detailed information on its nefarious purposes
* Demystifies security issues surrounding Netcat
* Case studies featuring dozens of ways to use Netcat in daily tasks

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